• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice : How Does Jealousy Contribute to Othellos Downfall?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice : How Does Jealousy Contribute to Othello?s Downfall? Jealousy is extremely powerful. It has the power to destroy relationships and engulf the mind. Once the thoughts of jealousy take root in one?s mind, they wreak havoc and destruction. Jealously can easily ignite anger in a person and cause its victim fall prey to obsession. In Shakespeare?s tragic play, The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice, several of the characters fall prey to jealousy. However, no character falls victim to jealousy more than Othello. Jealousy eventually helps lead Othello to his tragic downfall by causing Othello to abandon all rationality, and become extremely gullible. In the play, Iago serves as the instigator for most of Othello?s problems. Iago is very jealous and upset at the beginning of the play. He is jealous of both Cassio and Othello. However, the jealousy soon turns to anger and then thoughts of revenge. He is angry with Othello because Othello did not give him the promotion he thought he deserved. ...read more.

Middle

This causes Othello to believe that if she deceived her father about their marriage, then she would have no problem lying and deceiving him. Iago later tells him that he is right to be concerned about Desdemona. Therefore, by inserting this doubt it allows Iago to devise a scheme to take advantage of Othello?s insecurities and gullibility. Iago feeds Othello with lies and fallacious thoughts, and Othello gobbles the lies up like candy, readily believing them. Then, little by little jealously fills Othello and he becomes enraged. Even though Othello denies his jealousy repeatedly, it is apparent that the feeling and thoughts have taken root in his mind. He tells "No Iago;/I'll see before I doubt; when I doubt, prove;/And on the proof, there is no more but this /Away at once with love or jealousy!" (Shakespeare 3.3.189-192) Since Othello believes that Desdemona is unfaithful with only suggestions, and no facts, shows he is prone to jealousy and is dreadfully gullible. Later, after Iago has planted strong suspicions in his mind, Othello goes to dinner where Desdemona drops the handkerchief that represents their love. ...read more.

Conclusion

These words increase the jealousy, anger and irritation in Othello, and in a way, it gives him more courage to kill his wife, which he does by suffocating her. After Desdemona?s death and Othello figures out the truth, he decides to commit suicide. When he gives his death speech, Othello tells the crowd that he wants to them to remember him not as someone who easily became jealous, but instead as someone who was misled. ?Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate, / Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you speak/ of one that loved not wisely but too well; / Of one not easily jealous but, being wrought??(Shakespeare 5.2.352-365). He blames himself for being so foolish, but he also blames Iago. Othello?s jealousy causes gullibility and helps reveal his own insecurities, which all help lead to his downfall. Othello lets his own insecurities from jealousy keep him from questioning Iago's accusations and when finally he gives into Iago's lies, he sees what Iago wants him to see. This causes him to go mad and ultimately kill himself when he realizes the truth and what he has done. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Othello essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How and why does Othello's character change during the course of the play? How ...

    4 star(s)

    This keeps the Moor's antagonism high throughout each day. His actions become heavier, as he seeks advice from Iago for severe exploits, shown by, "How shall I murder him, Iago?" Iago gives him pointers at things Othello has missed that Iago thinks that might interest the Moor, when he states, "And did you see the handkerchief?"

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Give a detailed analysis of Othello's final speech,

    3 star(s)

    his attention and so he can begin his confession and his quest for forgiveness. There is a sense of tragic fate throughout the play from the interrogation of Othello over his love for Desdemona in front of the governors in Act I.

  1. Who is responsible for Othello's downfall?

    I meet the captains at the citadel'. Although these requirements society has of Othello do not help matters, and are party responsible for the tragic run of events, there are still more factors to consider before the question can be answered.

  2. How and why does Othello's language change over the course of the Play?

    When Cassio and Bianca have gone, Othello comes back and in one speech shows that he can still hardly believe what has happened, "Ay, let her rot, and perish, and be damned tonight; for she shall not live. No, my heart is turned to stone: I strike it, and it hurts my hand.

  1. What extent does racism contribute to Othello's downfall?

    This essay will explore "What extent does racism contribute Othello's downfall?" A tragic event is a disastrous or fateful. A tragic story has a serious theme, which results in death or defeat and a tragic hero is a man who displays courage or noble qualities, but has a downfall.

  2. How Shakespeare creates chaos in Othello's mind

    undying love for Desdemona with deep passion through his words by saying he would rather be condemned to hell than lose his love for her. At the time when he says these words, Desdemona is exiting the stage, suggesting that Othello is not only confessing his love to her but

  1. 'Othello': A Tragedy of Deception or a Tragedy of Self-deception? Depicting the downfall ...

    honour, that with the little godliness I have I did full hard forbear him.' In developing the honourable nature of Othello whilst condemning Iago in the minds of the audience, here, Shakespeare gives weight to the proposal that the play is a tragedy of deception.

  2. Describe Othello's Weaknesses.

    He almost luxuriates himself in his self-imposed epic stature, but fails to realise that his passions are being consumed by a ?most heathenish? villain. Unlike his wife Desdemona, he simply puts too much strength in passion alone and cannot balance passion with the human limitation of reason.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work