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The two characters with the most contradictory ideas, attitudes and responses throughout the whole novel are Mrs.Birling and Sheila

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Introduction

Write about two characters of contradictive attitudes that are used to pass the philosophy and ideas of the writer. Refer to the text. In my opinion, the two characters with the most contradictory ideas, attitudes and responses throughout the whole novel are Mrs.Birling and Sheila, Mrs.Birling daughter. At the beginning of the play the first descriptions of Sheila and Mrs.Birling are different. They have different opinions on importance and life. After the Inspector arrives both women react in a different way to the news; one is distressed and the other unfazed. They seem to be on diverging terms with each other. Mainly in the way each confess their connections with Eva Smith and the way they behave after the Inspector leaves. At the beginning of Act 1, Sheila is a very different person from the character at the end of Act 3. She has just got engaged to Gerald Croft, and is very excited about her future. ...read more.

Middle

She acts surprised to see him, and says"Oh- sorry. I didn't know." She asks what the Inspector is doing there, saying, "What's all this about?" She does not expect it to be anything either very unpleasant, or anything involving her. When her father says, "Nothing to do with you, Sheila. Run along." it shows that he is trying to protect her from having anything to do with the situation. Again, it seems that Sheila is overprotected from unpleasant things like this, and always has been. Sheila's first reaction is "Oh how horrible!" and later she asks questions such as "What happened to her then?" This shows her distress and real concern for Eva. Later, she talks "warmly" about what she thinks about Eva's death which is a "rotten shame." This shows that she is honest when she says this. Sheila also says, "These girls aren't cheap labour - they're people." This shows that Sheila is broad-minded and can see the problems with society. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think this shows that she knows she is guilty and she does not want to make herself more at fault than she already is. She does not accept her responsibilities because she tries to alter the blame on to other people. Finally, she says "I accept no blame for it al all", which indicates that she doesn't feel any sympathy at all for Eva Smith. Throughout the whole play I see no resemblance between Sheila and Mrs. Birling. During the Inspector's visit, Sheila changed from a selfish, spoiled, excited, newly engaged girl, into a caring, responsible and open-minded person. Out of all the Birlings, and Gerald Croft, Sheila changes the most. She learns from the Inspector, and understands the purpose of his visit; to warn them of what will happen if they do not change their ways. She admits her wrong actions, regrets and learns from her mistakes and therefore she can become a better person in the future. On the contrary, her mother, who is supposed to be an adult does not admit her obvious and unashamed guilt and therefore learns nothing. Savvas Proestos 1 ...read more.

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