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The two poems I have chosen to compare are 'Half-caste' by John Agard and 'They'll say, "She must be from another country"' by Imtiaz Dharker. Both of the poems are about personal identity and coming to terms with your heritage

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Introduction

English GCSE Coursework - Comparing and Contrasting Two Poems The two poems I have chosen to compare are 'Half-caste' by John Agard and 'They'll say, "She must be from another country"' by Imtiaz Dharker. Both of the poems are about personal identity and coming to terms with your heritage and culture. In both poems, the speaker is clearly seen as an outsider due to their different cultures and is therefore looked down upon. Both of these poets are challenging the people who judge them in different ways. John Agard is asking why he is treated that way, and Imtiaz Dharker is saying she is proud to be different. In 'Half-caste' I think John Agard is very comfortable with his two different cultures, but he feels he is viewed as only half a person because he is only half English. ...read more.

Middle

He then challenges the readers again by saying "Explain yuself" he is demanding an explanation of such a term "half-caste". Agard then goes on to use symbolism to try and help definition of this "half-caste" term. "Yu mean when picasso mix red and green is a half-caste canvas." Here is he saying that when Picasso, probably the most famous painter of the 20th century painted half-caste or, in his so-called superiors eyes, inferior painting when he mixed two colours. Notice how there is no use of capital letters, showing no acknowledgment of "picasso" being a name. This symbolism is seen throughout the poem in different examples, in the next one he refers to the weather in England; "Yu mean when light an shadow mix in de sky is a half-caste weather/" this idea is then turned against the English; "well in dat case England ...read more.

Conclusion

glow I half-caste human being cast half-a-shadow" Here he is saying that he is half-caste, so, according to the white people's logic, he must ony have half of the things normal people have, for he is inferior, and only half-caste, not whole.. Immediately after this, Agard says to the reader that they "must come back tomorrow wid de whole of yu eye an de whole of yu ear an de whole of yu mind." Here he repeats of "whole" instead of "half". He is telling the reader to come back with an open mind instead of a prejudice one. Then he says "an I will tell yu de other half of my story" this means that he isn't inferior and does have another half, which people can learn about if they so wish, because people only know what they accept. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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