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The War of the Worlds Is a Masterpiece of Suspense and Thrilling

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Introduction

David McKay War of the Worlds essay 17/9/01 THE WAR OF THE WORLDS IS A MASTERPIECE OF SUSPENSE AND THRILLING WRITING During the book, "The War of the Worlds", H.G. Wells does manage to create an atmosphere of suspense and tension, with some thrills to accompany them. His amazing knowledge of space and the unknown, combined with a wild imagination, given incentive by the creatures around him, gives the threat of a space invasion more plausible then it would without the knowledge and creativity. Since he is a scientist, his factual evidence backing up his imagination gives it a more realistic outcome, as more intense. We know that what he is saying is true, that it does have meaning and that makes us more into the story than a totally fictional story, involving aliens. HG Wells also spends a lot of time describing the Martians in depth. ...read more.

Middle

He does it again when he describes the Martians. We already know that the Martians have landed, and have started the quest to conquer the world, but you would normally expect a description of a character as soon as he/she/it enters the picture. H.G. Wells withholds the information on the Martians until a couple of chapters after we have met them. We can use our own imagination to have a guess at what the Martians are like but as they are the main characters of the book and they are not earthly, we have a natural instinct as humans to try and find out what they are really like. David McKay His false sense of security, give to the humans in "The Thunderchild", create tension. We don't know if the humans are going to have their first successful offensive manoeuvre on the Martians, or if they are about to get roasted by the heat ray, just as many of their fellow race have. ...read more.

Conclusion

He hints in places that because of their equal vulnerability to man, a virus or bacteria of some kind can defeat them. He says "Micro-organisms, which cause so much disease and pain on earth, have either never appeared on Mars or Martians sanitary science eliminated them years ago." The normal reader would probably over look this, as he wouldn't know that the Martians died from bacteria and that is how they were defeated. Tension is created in the chapter entitled "Death of the Curate". After the author and narrator, HG Wells, accidentally kill the Curate we see that a Martian is moving into his position. We do not know if the Martian is going to get him or what. The suspense of when the tentacle leaves but then renters, builds up the tension again and so this chapter is full of suspense and tension, and HG Wells manages to convey this in his writing. Overall, HG Wells manages to use suspense and tension to great effect in his novel. ...read more.

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