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The world of the ranch is a man's world. Discuss.

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Introduction

The world of the ranch is a man's world. Discuss. Of Mice and Men is set on a ranch in California during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Many men were out of work due to the Wall Street Crash; and ranches were seen as a place where men could go to get work, be fed and be housed. The appearance of the ranch lacks any emotion: "The bunk- house was a long, rectangular building... the walls were whitewashed and the floor unpainted." Emotion seems to effeminate to have in a ranch. Only the bare essentials are present. Ranch work is very hard, and is most suited to men. The ranch in the book is nearly entirely inhabited by men. Men, Curley and his father, run it; even those at the bottom of the hierarchy (Candy and Crooks) are male. The only woman on the ranch is Curley's wife, and it is clear that she does not enjoy it. ...read more.

Middle

This life of moving around the country, working wherever work is to be found, never 'Putting down roots' is much more likely to be lived by a man. Most women's motherly instincts make them want to create a family and have children. As I have said before, a ranch is no place for families. The workers on the ranch seem to be very unfriendly to each other. As work is temporary, a ranch is not a place where relationships of any kind are likely to develop. One of the only friendships on the ranch is between Curley and Slim. This friendship probably developed because they both are on the ranch all year round, and therefore see each other much more often. The only time in the book we see real kindness between two workers is after George shoots Lennie. Slim says to George: "Come on George. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is frequently called, "Nigger". Candy tells George: "Yes sir. Jesus we had fun. They let the nigger come in that night." This shows that Crooks is mistreated enormously just because of his colour. Most of the men on the ranch are racist; but only because most white people living in the States at this time were. The ranch is not a suitable world for Candy. Candy lost his hand in an accident at work. He is very old, and clearly doe not enjoy life on the ranch. He doesn't get paid as much as the other workers because of his disability. Candy desperately wants to escape the ranch; he pleads George to let him come and live with them in their 'dream' house: "S'spose I went in with you guys...I could cook and tend the chickens and hoe the garden...I'd make a will an' leave my share to you guys in case I kick off, 'cause I ain't got no relatives..." This clearly shows that Candy will do anything to escape the Ranch. Charlie Lovell ...read more.

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