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There is a broad based ethical debate taking place within today's medical and scientific fields. This debate primarily centers around the use of science and technology in dealing with human life.

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Introduction

There is a broad based ethical debate taking place within today's medical and scientific fields. This debate primarily centers around the use of science and technology in dealing with human life. In his article 'Sporting With Life' Dr. Lester D. Freidman cites the ethical problem in this way. The potential destructiveness of nuclear power, the morality of organ transplants, the possible uses and misuses of DNA, and the wonder and fear created by the space exploration program - just to cite some clear examples - gives us all pause to contemplate the ramifications of scientific endeavors made in the name of humanity, yet having the potential to destroy it. (185) Mary Shelly's Frankenstein provides a dramatic case study of what goes wrong when people sport with life and attempt to 'play God'. Victor's motivation, process and reaction to his creation can be clearly contrasted to God's creative and redemptive process. This contrast will demonstrate society's need for self-imposed medical and scientific limitations through identifying our human incompetence in attempting to 'play God'. Victor's motivation for creating life stands in stark contrast to God's motivation. It is obvious from reading that Victor's motivation was purely selfish in nature. ...read more.

Middle

David Ketterer notes the monster's awful dilemma when he wrote, 'The monster is an object of alarm not only because he is different but because he appears to be assembled imperfectly' (10). When comparing Victor's creation process to that of Yahweh God's, one finds additional contrasts to the comparisons. It is discovered over and over again in holy scripture that God is a loving God who created with well-thoughtout, methodically pre- planned action. Another unmistakable feature of Genesis 1 is its presentation of the creation as a place of order, system and structure. 'We live in a cosmos, not a chaos, and we do so because of the creative word and action of God' (Wright 215). The first book of the bible (the book of origins) begins with; Then God said, 'Let us make human beings in our image and likeness...' (Genesis 1:26 NCV) The very fact that God created man in His image indicates that his creation has order and meaning. Because God's purpose for creating was opposite to that of Victor's, He wanted to provide an environment that would reflect His love to His creation. He wanted His loving creation to experience fullness, meaning and purpose in life. ...read more.

Conclusion

If your law had not been my delight, I would have perished in my affliction. I will never forget your precepts. (Psalms 199:90-93 NIV) Conclusion After comparing and contrasting the core elements of creation as performed by Victor Frankenstein and Yahweh God it is accurate to say that only the omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent God is the only capable creator for life. Finite man does not and will never posses the necessary attributes to bear the responsibility of being a creator. Lester Freidman provides a great insight to the cosmic task of creating life when he said, Responsibility begins, not ends, with creation. (184) Creation is not a single act without ongoing responsibility. Genesis 2 focuses specifically on God's human creatures. Instead of merely appearing in the last act, so to speak, we consistently hold center stage;.... (Walsh/Middleson 54) Creation is an ongoing process in need of a supernatural and loving creator to properly care for its creation. Creation is not so much something that God did as something God is doing. (Wilkinson 31) All of mankind's combined ingenuity could not sufficiently manage the task. Victor demonstrated no such ongoing work. There was no attempt at redeeming the broken relationship between he and the monster. Frankenstein's turn away from an outward union with nature and toward an internalization of his imagination forces him to become overly self-conscious and destroys his social self. ...read more.

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