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Therefore in Act 2 scenes 1&2 Shakespeare uses a variety of techniques to create a dramatic tension and to introduce the audience to his characters. For example by the language and words Lady Macbeth uses portrays her as an evil

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Introduction

Macbeth is a play about a Thane who plots to kill the king, along with his wife's influence, after he has been visited by 3 witches who told him that he would be king. Macbeth was written by a poet called William Shakespeare in 1604-1605. The King at that time was King James I who employed Shakespeare in 1603 to work in his theatre. King James I of England was also the Scottish King. He was King James VI of Scotland. He was an expert in torture. He designed torture instruments for fun. He was a Catholic King and he executed a lot of people most of whom were Protestants. He believed in the supernatural especially witch craft. He even wrote a book on Deamonology. In fact, he believed that a storm that nearly killed him was sent by witches so he sent out men to find them and they went to North Berwich where they killed a few women. The play is based on social and historical facts. For example the King at that time was a Scottish so was King Duncan in Macbeth. Macbeth in the play also believed in the supernatural just like King James I. A sailor in Macbeth was hit by a storm which had been sent by a witch just like the incident that happened to King James I. ...read more.

Middle

Macbeth says "Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going." In Macbeth's soliloquy iambic pentameter is inconsistent. It has been shaken up to show Macbeth's shakiness and trembling. For example he says "As this which now I draw." This line is only 6 syllables long unlike the next line which is 11 syllables long. "Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going." Shakespeare uses lexical sets of violence, the supernatural and the senses. This suggests to us that Macbeth is trying to think like a murderer. He does this in order to build up his courage so that he won't be able to change his mind. He says "The curtains sleep, witchcraft celebrates." Shakespeare is making Macbeth's thoughts more evil. He is now in an evil frame of mind and he is in an absolute turmoil which he can barely keep control of. He is completely entranced by evil. It might be that the witches have taken over his body or it might just be that the darkness is bringing out Macbeth's evil side. Macbeth now at this time is so determined that Duncan will die that he says "I go and it is done." As far as Macbeth is concerned Duncan is as good as dead. At the end of Macbeth's soliloquy he uses the words "Knell" and "Hell." ...read more.

Conclusion

He has now gone over to the evil and dark side. He knows that he is going to hell and that God has stopped blessing him. He wanted to say Amen but it was stuck in his throat. The inability to pray in Shakespeare's time was thought to be bewitched. It was as if the witches had taken power and control over his body. Macbeth mentions the word "God" "sleep" and "Amen" so often because he knows that these are the things he is never going to be able to do or say ever again. He has been cut off from God, sleep and is incapable of saying a prayer. He has been separated from the natural world and will now begin to live in a godless world full of corruption and evil. Lady Macbeth uses her control and dominance over Macbeth to take charge of the situation. She commands Macbeth and says "Give me the daggers." A sharp, short and strong command. She has pulled herself together and is back to her old evil self. Now that the murder was over Macbeth and herself had switched places. He was the coward one and she was the powerful one once again. The scene ends with persistent knocking on the gate. Someone has come to Macbeth's castle. The knocking terrifies Macbeth and once again he is reminded of the evil deed he has done. The knocking may represent the sound of his heartbeat or symbolise the inevitability of justice catching up with them. ...read more.

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