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This paper is a critical analysis of Keat's piece,

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Introduction

Autumn Analysis: John Keats 1. Autumn has to be the most overlooked season of the year. There are plenty of literary pieces on the rejuvenating spring, the beauty of summer, and the seemingly dreary winter, but this is the first poem I have read about the splendor of autumn. John Keats fully recognizes autumn's importance as he touches on the amazing things that occur during the harvest season. To illustrate the amazing things that take place in autumn Keats uses personification to bring autumn to life in the form of soft haired girl who doesn't recognize her beauty or impact on nature. In the first stanza of "To Autumn," Keats uses a vast amount of imagery to force the reader to stop and reflect on the wondrous things that happen each autumn. In the midst of Keats' description of autumn comes the first evidence of personification. Keats tells us that the sun and autumn are great bosom friends. That they work together in order to achieve the ripening of the fruit, the opening of the flowers, and the plumping of gourds. 2. Abstract This paper is a critical analysis of Keat's piece, "To Autumn". ...read more.

Middle

The poem is rather literal in its meaning as it does not convey a deeper level of meaning that relates to the reader. The poem fails to "move" the reader in a philosophical, idealistic or moralistic way, and therefore bears no significant message to the reader. That is not to say that the poem lacks meaning or metaphorical significance, the poem was written to convey a sense of purpose to life and the worth of death. The poem achieves this by using descriptive and vivid expressions to describe the essence of autumn. The poem uses powerful language to achieve effect. It often makes use of imagery, exaggerated language and onomatopoeia to create an atmosphere of the English autumn, for the reader. Language such as this excerpt from the first stanza, And fill all fruits with ripeness to the core, To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells This type of language, especially adjectives such as ripeness and plump, provide the reader with an excellent description of the landscape. Onomatopoeic effect and alliteration are used rather well in the following example, Thy hair soft lifted by the winnowing wind; This use of language creates a rather humble and peaceful atmosphere for the reader. ...read more.

Conclusion

4. ... quot;half-reaped" - there is a "winnowing wind" but it is not cold and bitter like winter because he writes "they hair soft lifted by the winnowing wind". In this second stanza, he also shows what Autumn has and brings - its characteristics and occupations. This stanza has a feeling of contentment and yet impermanence, the cider reaches its "last oozings" and the harvest is finishing "...while thy hook spares the next swath...". Autumn reaches its peak but the peak is slowly fading. Talk of drugs to ease pain was mentioned "Drowsed with the fume of poppies". This was linking with one of the Romantic's pastimes but maybe also the pain-relief for Keats. He describes corn being hooked and cider being pressed. All of this stanza may again relate to Keats life as he knew of his illness and death was beginning to enter his thoughts. The last stanza is important and uses brilliant and poetic language with Keats showing his joy in words. Music is an important topic here with with Keats claiming that, like spring, autumn has its own music "..thou hast thy music too" and he used w ...read more.

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