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This particular passage from the novel "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens depicts a troublesome night of restlessness.

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Introduction

This particular passage from the novel "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens depicts a troublesome night of restlessness. The narrator, who speaks in first person, a well-educated individual, endures a night of seclusion and restlessness as he is shorn of sleep by the atmosphere within the room The opening lines commence the passage quite suddenly, with two exclamatory sentences. "What a doleful night!" This demonstrates that the narrator has been trying to sleep for quite sometime now, without success and has become upset. As he is thinking, him mind begins to jump from subject to subject and beings to explore the room. He thinks of all the discomforts presented by the room in form of heat, dust, dirt, and insects. Also, it becomes apparent that the narrator is unfamiliar with the room throughout him thoughts, and thus providing the reasoning as to why he feels aloof. Continuing to fail attaining sleep, his senses are heightened in response to the unfamiliarity and discomfort with the room. ...read more.

Middle

The thought of physical pain then led him mind to the thought of a past suicide which he read in the news paper. He then realizes the suicide occurred in the same room which he occupies now; he panics and scours the room for "red-marks". "I had read in the newspapers how a gentleman, unknown had come to the Hummums in the night, and had gone to bed, and had destroyed himself, and had been found in the morning weltering in blood." The quick and frequent punctuation in the quotation demonstrates that he is thinking, with unorganized thoughts which are natural. Him reference to the blood as "red-marks" demonstrates that he is frightened and trying to make the situation as calm as possible. The remainder of the passage demonstrates the solitude created by the atmosphere of the room. The narrator conveys this on two occasions. Firstly, the room is referred to as an area in which no one may enter or exit. ...read more.

Conclusion

The extensive imagination of the man may be explained by the fact that he is extremely over tired and is creating this images and sounds from his desperation for sleep, and his mind is simply trying to entertain him. There is a lot of punctuation in the passage as well as a variety of it. This is because the man is thinking and it is natural to be unorganized in thought, especially when trying to sleep. This also explains the sudden jump from topic to topic throughout the passage. Dickens goal of the passage was to relate the troubles of sleeping in places foreign to your home bed. He does this effectively as at one point or another, everyone has endured the troubles of trying to sleep and is something that people can easily relate to. He employs a great use of the language to display realism and also, from the form of language can determine certain aspects of the character, such that is a well-read male. ...read more.

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