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To Autumn by John Keats.

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Introduction

Rachael Elliott L6G To Autumn by John Keats. John Keats uses many different structures and imagery to convey his poetic impression of autumn. Keats uses personification and metaphors to portray his attitude and to cleverly change his viewpoint in the last stanza of the poem. What is interesting about the poem is that Keats breaks conventional poems of nature by writing about autumn in the way that poets before him had written about spring. Keats opens with an iambic pentameter; this produces an effect of flow with the words, which is reflected in his use of the adjective "mellow". The next two lines are a lovely use of personification to depict the season in conjunction with the sun. What is unusual is the use of the verb "conspire" suggesting to the reader an ill intent whereas once the reader continues is revealed to be a plan to help ripen and enrich the vegetation, the use of the word "bless" suggests an almost religious reference to nature. ...read more.

Middle

What becomes very obvious in this stanza is that after the subtle use of classical language in the first stanza it takes a more major role in this stanza. Infact it is nearly all in that style. This use of classical language paints a picture of a goddess at one with nature. This stanza has a very relaxed atmosphere as Keats describes the goddess crushing apples and her hair blowing gently on a breeze. This is a metaphor, as Keats portrays autumn as the beautiful goddess suggesting a close link with nature. The image of a goddess portrays creativity and shows Keats awe at the power of nature. "Half reaped..." this emphasises the languid atmosphere of the stanza. Keats refers to flowers in line 18; this is odd as one wouldn't normally associate with autumn. This is something that is maintained throughout the poem; Keats breaks the stereotypical or clich�d picture of spring and brings in a new suggestion that in fact autumn is far more romantic and important. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, John Keats, as a member of the Romantic Movement, viewed nature in a positive light. This is demonstrated throughout the poem by a number of positive metaphors and similes for nature. The most obvious metaphor being that of the goddess in stanza two who enjoys the changing season to such an extent it is compared to being under the influence of opium. However this positivity is not carried into the last stanza as Keats also views autumn as a time of decay as well as fruition. Keats writes that "small gnats mourn", while gnats only represent an almost insignificant aspect of nature, they could be said to represent much of nature which dies in autumn. He almost disguises this negativity by countering with positive imagery of how the "swallows twitter". Keats maintains the same rhyme system throughout the poem to emphasise the rhythm of nature. It has a very natural flow to it because it is written using iambic pentameter and enjambment echoing the theme of calm and serenity. ...read more.

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