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To compare the ways in which these poems display the horrors of war. I have selected three poems, The Soldier, by Rupert Brooke, Dulce et Decorum Est, and Anthem for Doomed Youth, both written by Wilfred Owen.

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Introduction

Poetry Coursework Compare how these poems show the horrors of World War 1. To compare the ways in which these poems display the horrors of war. I have selected three poems, ?The Soldier?, by Rupert Brooke, ?Dulce et Decorum Est?, and ?Anthem for Doomed Youth?, both written by Wilfred Owen. I chose ?Anthem for Doomed Youth? and ?Dulce et Decorum Est? because they are very similar and show the horrors of the war. On the other hand, I chose ?The Soldier? because it is a complete contrast and is about the remembrance of the soldiers, who are portrayed as heroes. Wilfred Edward Salter Owen was born on March 18, 1893. He was abroad teaching until he visited a hospital for the wounded, he then decided to return to England in 1915 and enlisted. Owen was injured in March 1917 and was sent home. By august 1917 he was considered fit for duty and he then returned to the front lines. Just seven days before the Armistice he was shot dead by a German machine gun attacker. Owen was only twenty-five years old. The title ?Dulce et Decorum Est? is part of a Latin saying, Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori, which means it is sweet and fitting to die for one?s country. ...read more.

Middle

Owen writes, ?if you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from froth-corrupted lungs, Bitter as cud?? In this last stanza it seems as if he is directing this poem to someone. It also seems as if he wants them to go through what he has been through. Owen writes about the phrase ?Dulce et?? in the last four lines and writes, ?My friend, you would not tell with such high zest to children ardent for some desperate Glory, The old lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.? This disproves the title ?Dulce et Decorum Est?. This last part is aimed at a woman called Jesse Pope who was for the World War 1 and glorified everything to do with it. Jesse Pope passed judgement on men who were scared and refused to go to the war. Wilfred Owen wanted Jesse Pope to go through what the soldiers went through and decide whether she would criticise the people who were afraid of going to war. ?Anthem for Doomed Youth? is a sonnet written by Wilfred Owen. The poem consists of two rhetorical questions and some answers. The poem depicts the comparisons of funerals and death in battle. The first line of the poem, ?What passing-bells for those who die as cattle??, communicates to the reader a melancholic image of soldiers whose deaths were in vain because they were fighting a futile cause. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand �Dulce et Decorum Est� is just a poem. �The Soldier� has an instruction and how to honour the deceased soldiers. �Dulce et Decorum Est� is a first hand experience of life on the front lines, in contrast to �The Soldier� which is from Rupert Brooke�s mind as he never fought in the war. �The Soldier� may have given families of soldiers hope, in contradiction to �Dulce et Decorum Est� which may have caused vast amounts of controversy and hatred towards Wilfred Owen. In studying the poems and comparing them there is a final conclusion. Wilfred Owens poems have a tendency to be more explicit and striking, while Rupert Brooke glorifies the war and the soldiers who fought in it. This is because Wilfred Owen was strongly against war and felt that people who were supporters of the war should understand what they had to go through.           This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ ...read more.

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