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To Kill a Mocking Bird. Atticus teaches Jem and Scout many important lessons through out the book.

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Introduction

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is about siblings Jem and Scout, their father that is raising them, and all of their friends. This book discusses the different sides of human life and the many faces of racism. Atticus teaches Jem and Scout many important lessons through out the book. He teaches then lessons about how to treat others and self respect. He teaches them about respect, and how to grow up. The three most important lessons that he teaches them through out the whole book are what real courage is, why fist glances are wrong, and why it was wrong to kill Tom Robinson and to put Boo in the spotlight after rescuing them. A very important lesson that Atticus teaches his kids is true courage. Mrs. Dubose was a very sick old lady and knew her time would be up in a matter of time. Jem and Scout couldn't see that and didn't know why she kept on yelling rude and nasty comments at them. Jem ruins her flowers with a baton and is sentenced to read to her for a month. Soon after Jem's obligation is fulfilled, Mrs. Dubose dies. Here's how Atticus describes her battle: "She had her own views about things, a lot different from mine, maybe... son, I told you that if you hadn't lost your head I'd have made you go read to her. ...read more.

Middle

If you don't see eye-to-eye with a person, look at it from their point of view. Don't automatically dismiss it as being stubbornness, pretend that you're them, and try to figure out the compelling question of why do they do what they do? "... Jem, see if you can stand in Bob Ewell's shoes a minute. I destroyed his last shred of credibility at that trial, if he had any to begin with. The man had to have some kind of comeback, his kind always does. So if spitting in my face and threatening me saved Mayella Ewell one extra beating, that's something I'll gladly take. He had out take it out on somebody and I'd rather it be me than that houseful of children out there (218)". Atticus, although insulted, still put himself into Bob Ewell's shoes. He made himself see that he was suffering for the greater good. He wanted himself to get the beatings instead of all of Bob Ewell's children. It wouldn't be the first thought on my head, or even the second thought. Atticus is a special kind of man that would rather get spit in the face, than have rage taken out on others. "If you had been on that jury, son, and eleven other boys like you, Tom would be a free man. ...read more.

Conclusion

He felt sorry for her, and always was willing to help her. By helping her, he was also accused of rape and beating. Another mockingbird in the book was Boo Radley. He hardly ever came out of the house, but did all that he could to help. When Miss. Maudie's house was burning down, Boo placed a warm blanket over Scout's shoulders so that she wouldn't freeze to death. He gave Jem and Scout gifts, toys and things, but when he saved them, he also gave them their lives. There were many rumors circulating around Boo, but he was just an innocent guy trying to live his life. "Yeah, an' they all thought it was Stoner's Boy messin' up their clubhouse an' throwin' ink all over it an'... An' they chased him 'n' never could catch him 'cause they didn't know what he looked like, an' Atticus, when they finally saw him, why he hadn't done any of those things..." "Most people are, Scout, when you finally se them (281)". That quote perfectly describes Boo. Everyone thought that he had done horrible and unspeakable things, but really he hadn't. When they finally go to know him, he was really nice, and everyone liked him. With this last lesson, the book ends, with the lesson that once you finally get to know somebody, they can be really nice, all you have to do is step into their skin and shoes and walk around. When you do, you could find a friend. ...read more.

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