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'To Kill a Mocking Bird'. The first example of prejudice in this novel is shown by the Town people concerning Arthur (Boo) Radley. Scout suitably described him as a 'malevolent phantom' because they thought he was some kind of monster

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Introduction

Analyse the various forms of prejudice you encounter in the novel Prejudice is an adverse judgement or opinion formed beforehand or without knowledge or examination of the facts. It is shown in a lot of different ways in the novel 'To Kill a Mocking Bird'. The first example of prejudice in this novel is shown by the Town people concerning Arthur (Boo) Radley. Scout suitably described him as a 'malevolent phantom' because they thought he was some kind of monster and was also described as "alien". He was said to be the one committing all the crimes in Maycomb. When everyone was asleep at night he would be sneaking around the streets peeping in people's windows. When azaleas were frozen it was said that he had breathed on them. Even the children were affected by these rumours. They wouldn't touch the pecans that fell off the Radley's tree in the school yard because according to them, if you did, you would die. ...read more.

Middle

Calpurnia admonished Scout with an angry tone saying that Walter was 'company' and that he could eat how ever he wished. When Scout retaliated saying how Walter was not 'company' and that he was just a 'Cunningham', Calpurnia was shocked at Scout's blatant prejudice and tried to impress upon her the need to treat everyone equally. Another example of class prejudice is when Aunt Alexandra doesn't want Scout to play with Walter Cunningham because they are lower class whites, but not as low as the Ewells who are the lowest form of whites, "white trash", but even they look down on the blacks. The black community are automatically seen as the bottom of the class system. That brings me onto the last form of prejudice in this novel, racial prejudice. This is shown in the novel with regard to Calpurnia, Dolphus Raymond and Tom Robinson. Tom Robinson is found guilty of raping Mayella Ewell, but the accusers where suspected of lying. ...read more.

Conclusion

His son Jem also dislikes the racism in the town; he couldn't believe it that a jury could convict an innocent man just because he was black. "It ain't right!" he says. Miss Maudie, a Maycomb resident and neighbour of Finch's, says she is proud of "those people in this town who say fair play is not marked white only." A lot of people learn from the prejudice in this novel; Scout learns that she must accept people for who they are and not be judgemental. Jem is mostly affected by the trial and realises that Maycomb is in a cocoon of prejudice. The whole town begins to learn as a result of the Trial and Mrs Maudie describes this change as being "a baby-step towards fair-mindedness". Atticus is an example to everyone. He understands that the only way to break down prejudice and misunderstanding is to see things from another's point of view- "to climb into his skin and walk around in it". This is the message of the whole novel. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sian Chamberlain - Webber ...read more.

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