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To Kill a Mockingbird and Wuthering Heights Comparison,

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Introduction

To Kill a Mockingbird and Wuthering Heights Comparison, For this comparison I am going to use the common theme of 'simple hell'. These two novels although vastly different in terms of theme, setting, period even structure of the novels both deals with the issues involved in and around simple hell. The two settings greatly affect the novels, in the way that the characters grow, their behaviour and their actions. In Wuthering Heights the main set for the novels is a windswept farm high on the Yorkshire Moors. It is set in a time between the late eighteenth and nineteenth century. Wuthering Heights is a farm, set on the Yorkshire Moors. Life is obviously not easy for the people who live there, as for most of the year they are battered by wind, rain and snow. The trees have grown at an angle as they are continually pushed over. As a result the farm is a bastion, with thick walls, jutting corner stones and deep set windows. From the novel there is either little or n o garden, giving the impression that this is a very no-frills sort of place. This may also effect the characters as they are gradually worn down by he lack of colour on the farm. The inside on the other hand is well lived in, it is still what you see is what you get but it has a feeling of comfort, the brass pots and pans over the fire help to give strength to the image that the inside of Wuthering Heights is a 'real' place. ...read more.

Middle

Heathcliff leaves Cathy when Hindley and the doctor return. When he is walking away in the garden at the grange he hears Cathy's screams, this distresses Heathcliff when he is a little further one he hears the screams end followed shortly by the cry of a newborn baby. When he makes it back to Wuthering Heights he is already heavily depressed, he realises the hell he has caused so many people. He has locked up Isabella and made her miserable, made Hindley come to the verge of suicide. He has given Edgar a child with no mother, indirectly killed his wife, and stole his sister. But for him the worst deed was turning his love mad, which must have caused her much pain, then at the end of it all, sent her well and truly over the edge, which killed her, to save her child. In the time when Lockwood arrives at the grange, Hindley has died and Heathcliff has become a dark and much more foreboding character. When Edgar dies Heathcliff comes to the grange and takes Hareton away, he oppresses Hareton until he becomes in fear of Hethcliff, even though as he is in adulthood he could easily over-power Heathcliff. When the second Cathy arrives, Heathcliff she's her for what she is, a perfect copy of her mother. This depresses Heathcliff who see's Hareton and Cathy falling in love just as he and her mother has, he then realises that he has treated Hareton just as Hindley treated him. This is shown as Heathcliff's last words before he took his own life were, "let us see how they play out with the same pieces reset". ...read more.

Conclusion

So in one last defiant attempt to stop the change they are becoming the worst they could possibly be, the racist values have been heightened to include any white person who has sympathy of any sort for the blacks of the town. When Atticus stands up for Tom, his name is instantly slandered. The racial prejudice is not just white to black. When the children go with Calpurnia to the black church they are greeted by jeers and a mob. Although Calpurnia quickly silences and disperses them it still shows that prejudices usually run both ways. The social prejudices are greatly related to family status, Aunt Alexandra exaggerates this. She believes greatly that family history is a great part in their life, and following in the family footsteps is the way forward in life. This is carried on throughout the town; it is generally followed that if your father was a farmer then the son shall too. This is even shown by Jem who wishes to grow up to become a lawyer like his father Atticus. This is also shown in the family gene pool, as generations seem to repeat themselves, as bloodlines remain intact. It seems quite likely that all of the families of Maycomb would trace their ancestry back to 2-3 founding families. Money also plays a part is status, with people like the Cunninghams who are considered the poorest of the poor with exception to the Ewell's and the blacks. The part of money cannot play a major part is status as there is a depression taking place at the time the novel is set in therefore money as a whole is not the commodity it normally is. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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