• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent can you feel sympathy for Malvolio

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To what extent can you feel sympathy for Malvolio? Malvolio plays the role of Olivia's self admiring butler. He takes advantage of his position in the house to abuse of those lower ranked in the house than him. These people are Sir Toby, Maria and Fabian, (Sir Andrew doesn't work in the house). These people have got fed up of this and decide to get their own back throughout the play. The dispute is that may be they went too far. Malvolio is smart in appearance and well dressed. Apart from this, Malvolio is pompous, vane, arrogant and has a lack of forgiveness. Malvolio's first entrance is in 1.5 l.2 and his first line of speech is in 67. If acted and spoken well it gives you a really strong idea of what Malvolio is like. Shakespeare makes you, straight away, make a stereo-type of Malvolio. The impression I got after his first line: 'Yes, and shall do, till the pangs of death shake him;' Was that he disliked Feste and that he was annoyed that Feste was getting attention from Olivia because Malvolio wanted Olivia all to himself because he is selfish. Then, 6 lines after he says: 'I marvel your ladyship takes delight in such a barren rascal.' ...read more.

Middle

I would laugh at him and say, 'Have a taste of your own medicine.' Later on in act 2.3 Sir Toby, Sir Andrew, Feste and Maria are having a party in the middle of the night. Malvolio interrupts the party, and he is really mad. He starts shouting at them and ends the party. Sir Toby, Feste, Sir Andrew and Maria think this is unfair. I think it is perfectly right what Malvolio did because he is only doing his job and Sir Toby, Feste, Sir Andrew and Maria would have been making a terrible noise in the middle of the night when everyone in the house is sleeping. Then there is the box tree scene in 2.5 where Maria, Sir Toby, Sir Andrew and Fabian decide to finally get their own back on Malvolio by writing a letter which looks like it is from Olivia to Malvolio. The letter contains all these stupid requests which, if Malvolio loves Olivia, he has to do such as wearing cross garters. I think this is a great plan and Malvolio will get his just desserts if it works out. I was laughing at the thought of what would happen. After in 3.4 Malvolio does dress up in cross gartered yellow stockings, spins around Olivia with a wide smile on his face and keeps kissing her. ...read more.

Conclusion

Think of me as you please. I leave my duty a little unthought of and speak out of my injury. The madly used Malvolio.' When Malvolio comes back and explains everything Olivia explains she had nothing to do with it. Olivia does feel sorry for Malvolio, but I think Malvolio expects her to do something to Sir Toby, Feste or Maria. She does not so Malvolio has a tantrum and shouts in 5.1 l.355 'I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.' I think this is typical of Malvolio but I do sympathise with him because everyone is happy but Malvolio is alone and hurt. I think he does deserve to get his revenge and there should be a sequel where Malvolio comes back and gets his own back. In the end I think Malvolio is mean at times but at others he is just doing his job. Also, during the play, he does not do enough things wrong to Sir Toby to be put in a dark room and bound up. I felt no sympathy at all for Malvolio at the box tree scene but soon after that stage in the play my sympathy rose enormously for him, to such an extent that I wanted him to get a big bucket of sludge full of all the grief he endured and pour it over Sir Toby. Jorge Alexander ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Twelfth Night section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Twelfth Night essays

  1. DID MALVOLIO DESERVE TO BE TREATED SO HARSHLY?

    "My lady bade me to tell you... If you can separate yourself & your misdemeanours, you are welcome to the house, if not, ... very willing to bid you farewell." Olivia has probably not, in so many words said this, & yet, Malvolio is repeating it, acting with a lot more authority than he possesses.

  2. Malvolio Makes a ‘Contemplative Idiot’ Out of Himself in The Box Tree Scene

    Malvolio's fantasy also involves the device of disguise. He imagines himself "in my branched velvet gown", which was the clothing of wealthy noblemen. He speaks of his fantasy of being 'Count' Malvolio, this is a wish to change identity, and his desire is based largely on the possibility of changing his status in society and obtaining more power.

  1. Looking at Act 2 scene 5 and Act 3 scene 4 consider the ...

    In Olivia's household he regards himself to be of a higher status than the other servants and they are all aware of it. This is pointed out in line 101 by Sir Toby when he says 'go rub your chain with crumbs'.

  2. We may laugh at Malvolio but to what extent does he deserve our sympathy?

    Malvolio also "marvels" that Olivia "takes a delight in such a barren rascal." This is mocking both Feste and Olivia and we get the impression that Malvolio is humourless "sick of self love". When he goes to return the ring to Viola (Cesario)

  1. How does Shakespeare manipulate the audience to dislike Malvolio towards the beginning of the ...

    Line 103, "...you would not give means for this uncivil rule; she shall know of it, by this hand." shows the threat. Malvolio's threat to tell Olivia it was Maria that started the unacceptable behaviour would have been a real threat, as Maria would have nowhere to go.

  2. What is your personal opinion of Malvolio and the way he is treated?

    wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabble like tinkers at this time of night?" (Lines 83-84) When he realises that this does not seem to have the effect he wanted he starts to use threats to try to shock them.

  1. Twelfth Night - We may laugh at Malvolio but to what extent does he ...

    However much we dislike Malvolio and all that he stands for being both a "a kind of puritan" and " a time-pleaser" we can't fail to see that Malvolio is perfectly reasonable in addressing Sir Toby and Sir Andrew calling them "my masters".

  2. Twelfth Night - Consider Shakespeare's portrayal of Malvolio throughout the play and say how ...

    This speech tells me certain things about Malvolio's personality. Firstly he is angry at all of them for disturbing Olivia, who he is very protective over. Secondly, he is angry at them for getting drunk, something that he does not approve of being a puritan. He does not understand why anybody would want to get drunk and makes fools of themselves by singing and acting merry.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work