• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' in terms of the character and the creation of tension?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Pre 20th Century Prose Fiction Coursework Question: To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' in terms of the character and the creation of tension? This essay will explain, discuss and examine the effects of Edgar Allen Poe's 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' had on other authors writing detective stories during the 19th century. 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' was a new kind of story and Edgar Allen Poe had many authors imitate him. Take Arthur Conan Doyle's detective, Sherlock Holmes, for example. Holmes quickly became one of the most famous detectives of that time and his stories were, and still are, loved all around the world. But not forgetting all of the other detective writers of that time too. To an extent, most detective stories of the 19th century have copied the original aspects of Poe's 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue.' This essay will examine Poe's influence on his successors. 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' was one of the first detective stories ever written. Because of this, Edgar Allen Poe has set a trend for other detective writers to follow. Poe has used a number different of 'points' in his story to create suspense and tension, which can be found in other detective stories of that time. ...read more.

Middle

It is apparent in 'The Speckled Band' when Helen Stoner told Holmes: 'It is impossible for any one to get in . . . . There are bars across the windows and all the doors are locked from the inside.' This all adds to the creation of tension in the mind of the reader. However, we can see that in 'The Great Pearl Mysteries' by Baroness Orczy there is no sealed death chamber, but in 'The Problem of Dressing Room A' and 'The Man with the Twisted Lip' there is no sealed death chamber, as such, but we do have a situation where there is no means of escape for the criminal without getting noticed. There is also a wrongly suspected man in the stories which we have read, apart from 'The Man with the Twisted Lip' when there is a wrongly but, he is the same man under a different name. In 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' there is a wrongly suspected man. It is said that: 'A postscript however, mentioned that Adolphe Le Bon had been arrested and imprisoned although nothing appeared to criminate him.' But it is obvious that 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' has a wrongly suspected man just for the sake of having one. ...read more.

Conclusion

The example of this kind of story, which we have read, is 'The Bruce-Partington Plans' by Arthur Conan Doyle. In this story, there is no sign of a locked room murder and we don't see Holmes drawing deductions from clues that the police have overlooked. However, although this story doesn't contain most of the classic rules, one or two still remain. For example, there was a wrongly suspected man for a short time. They thought that the man who was murdered, Cadogen West, had taken the papers. In conclusion to this essay, we can see that throughout the stories that we have read, how often the writers have imitated Poe's original six points. We can see that the writers have imitated the classic six points quite well. Some of the stories might not contain all of the six points, but the points they do contain have all added to the creation of suspense and tension in the mind of the reader. All of the writers we have looked at, in one way or another, have all tried, and successfully incorporated the basic character of Dupin into their own. It is evident that the most successful story that we have read has to be 'The Problem of Dressing Room A.' It has included all of the classic six points that Sayers mentioned about 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' and the outr� character of the detective. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Conan Doyle section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Conan Doyle essays

  1. An essay to investigate the disturbing and reassuring aspects in the three stories

    The word 'evil' in his description connotes to us the obvious that Dr. Roylott is an evil man, as well as his 'resemblance to a bird of prey' which suggests that he is an aggressive predator. This is a very disturbing description indeed because we naturally do not like such people.

  2. To what extent do the Sherlock Holmes stories you've studied typify the genre of ...

    But he doesn't just do descriptions of rooms or places; in "His Last Bow" he writes "One might have thought already that Gods curse hung heavy over a degenerate world, for there was an awesome hush and a feeling of vague expectancy in the sultry and stagnant air.

  1. How is tension built up in the monkeys paw, and in the telltale heart? ...

    A main factor in creating tension in this story is the narrator's state of mind, when he triumphs upon a discovery, the tension builds, 'I think it was his eye! Yes, it was this!' The reader wants to know more, and reads on.

  2. To what extent are the three/four stories we have investigated typical murder mystery or ...

    Then finally Sherlock Holmes explains to us what went on and how he worked it. Dr Watson is very close to Sherlock Holmes and it is clear from the start that Dr Watson has great admiration for Sherlock Holmes and they both know each other thoroughly as this quote suggests,

  1. g.c.s.e Examine The settings which the writers have chosen for their stories in

    This creates a picture in the mind of the reader and introducing the signal man to this tale. It is made apparent that the signal man does not trust the man the calling to him, this is apparent in his initial refusal to reply to the narrator.

  2. How did writers of nineteenth century short stories create and maintain a sense of ...

    Music was still sounding, but it was seen to proceed from a band of mortal musicians stationed in an orchestra near at hand. The air as yet redolent of incense, but it was incense unblended with stench. The ending of this story is very ironic.

  1. What featuresare disturbing or reassuring in your selection of 19th century texts?

    to see that not all aspects of 19th century writing are disturbing. Our sympathy for Hop Frog however is swiftly put behind us as his determination to seek for revenge takes over. This is alarming to us not only because murder is never assuring but also because we begin to

  2. What strategies did nineteenth century writers use to build dramatic tension?

    his carpet slippers", with his wife calling after him to return immediately and put his overcoat on. In the nineteenth century, there was an emphasis put upon propriety, particularly in the realm of dress, and to leave the house not fully dressed was seen to be absurd.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work