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To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' in terms of the character and the creation of tension?

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Introduction

Pre 20th Century Prose Fiction Coursework Question: To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' in terms of the character and the creation of tension? This essay will explain, discuss and examine the effects of Edgar Allen Poe's 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' had on other authors writing detective stories during the 19th century. 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' was a new kind of story and Edgar Allen Poe had many authors imitate him. Take Arthur Conan Doyle's detective, Sherlock Holmes, for example. Holmes quickly became one of the most famous detectives of that time and his stories were, and still are, loved all around the world. But not forgetting all of the other detective writers of that time too. To an extent, most detective stories of the 19th century have copied the original aspects of Poe's 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue.' This essay will examine Poe's influence on his successors. 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' was one of the first detective stories ever written. Because of this, Edgar Allen Poe has set a trend for other detective writers to follow. Poe has used a number different of 'points' in his story to create suspense and tension, which can be found in other detective stories of that time. ...read more.

Middle

It is apparent in 'The Speckled Band' when Helen Stoner told Holmes: 'It is impossible for any one to get in . . . . There are bars across the windows and all the doors are locked from the inside.' This all adds to the creation of tension in the mind of the reader. However, we can see that in 'The Great Pearl Mysteries' by Baroness Orczy there is no sealed death chamber, but in 'The Problem of Dressing Room A' and 'The Man with the Twisted Lip' there is no sealed death chamber, as such, but we do have a situation where there is no means of escape for the criminal without getting noticed. There is also a wrongly suspected man in the stories which we have read, apart from 'The Man with the Twisted Lip' when there is a wrongly but, he is the same man under a different name. In 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' there is a wrongly suspected man. It is said that: 'A postscript however, mentioned that Adolphe Le Bon had been arrested and imprisoned although nothing appeared to criminate him.' But it is obvious that 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' has a wrongly suspected man just for the sake of having one. ...read more.

Conclusion

The example of this kind of story, which we have read, is 'The Bruce-Partington Plans' by Arthur Conan Doyle. In this story, there is no sign of a locked room murder and we don't see Holmes drawing deductions from clues that the police have overlooked. However, although this story doesn't contain most of the classic rules, one or two still remain. For example, there was a wrongly suspected man for a short time. They thought that the man who was murdered, Cadogen West, had taken the papers. In conclusion to this essay, we can see that throughout the stories that we have read, how often the writers have imitated Poe's original six points. We can see that the writers have imitated the classic six points quite well. Some of the stories might not contain all of the six points, but the points they do contain have all added to the creation of suspense and tension in the mind of the reader. All of the writers we have looked at, in one way or another, have all tried, and successfully incorporated the basic character of Dupin into their own. It is evident that the most successful story that we have read has to be 'The Problem of Dressing Room A.' It has included all of the classic six points that Sayers mentioned about 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' and the outr� character of the detective. ...read more.

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