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To what extent do you agree that in Othello, Shakespeare presents ' Women as victims of men '?

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Introduction

To what extent do you agree that in Othello, Shakespeare presents ' Women as victims of men '? Shakespeare leaves us with no doubt that there are women victims in Othello. The men throughout the play use the women, whether it is because of the power of love or just jealousy. From the beginning of the play we see how Iago and Roderigo use Desdemona's predicament to cause trouble for Othello. ' I am one, sir, that comes to tell you, your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs.' As they tell Brabantio about Othello and Desdemona's marriage you become aware of how Desdemona is developing into a victim due to the rift between her and her father. ' How didst thou know 'twas she? ...read more.

Middle

Iago has caused so much grief to Othello, that now Desdemona has become the victim, she is dead. ' She turned to folly; and she was a whore.' Othello had been brainwashed by Iago and now he has committed a crime on Desdemona that she did not deserve, ' Thou art rash as fire to say that she was false. O, she was heavenly true!' Emilia knows that Desdemona was being faithful but has now become the unsuspecting victim. Othello finds this out from Emilia when she tells him and then confronts Iago about the lies that he has been telling. ' O mistress, villainy hath made mocks with love...if he say so, may his pernicious soul rot half a grain a day...you told a lie, an odious damned lie: upon my soul, a lie, a wicked lie!' ...read more.

Conclusion

' That she with Cassio hath the act of shame...Cassio confessed it...it was the handkerchief, an antique token', we know Emilia does not know why Iago wants it because he doesn't tell her, ' Be not acknown on't: I have use for it. Go leave me. In the last scenes of the book, Emelia acquires the same fate as Desdemona. Iago used his wife but when she fund out about his true intentions, decided he was in the wrong and told Othello the truth. Iago didn't like this so stabbed her from behind, ' Filth, thou liest!' Both Desdemona and Emelia were killed by their husbands in this play, they were not totally innocent but neither deserved to die. They were both victims of jealousy, Iago's jealousy of Othello promoting Cassio and Othello's insecurity towards Desdemona, and his friendship towards the ' Honest Iago '. Tom Green Mr Mar ...read more.

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