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To what extent do you believe Malcolm is correct when he refers to Macbeth and Lady Macbeth as ÒThis dead butcher and his fiend-like queenÓ?

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Introduction

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Middle

He convinces himself that he should kill Banquo whom he now sees as a threat as he was there when the witches made the prophecies. Macbeth still has to think carefully about it but it bothers him far less than the murder of Duncan did. As he does still think about his actions he is not yet a butcher but is no longer far from it. Macbeth does not tell Lady Macbeth about his plans for Banquo as they have started to grow apart. This is making Lady Macbeth very unhappy and she has already decided that they have lost more than they have gained even though they have gained the throne: �Nought�s had, all�s spent Where our desire is got without content.� She is starting to feel guilty for what they have done and deeply regrets it. Now Lady Macbeth is no longer fiend-like but plagued by guilt and unhappiness in her new role. In my opinion one of the most important turning points in Macbeth�s character is in the Banquet Scene when Banquo�s ghost haunts him. He goes to pieces in front of all the thanes and practically gives himself away. Lady Macbeth tries to cover up for him again but she can not calm him down. ...read more.

Conclusion

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