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'To what extent does act one of 'Romeo and Juliet' influence the events in the rest of the play and the tragic demise of the star-crossed lovers.

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Introduction

'Romeo and Juliet GCSE Coursework Essay' 'To what extent does act one of 'Romeo and Juliet' influence the events in the rest of the play and the tragic demise of the star-crossed lovers. 'Romeo and Juliet' is an example of a Shakespearean tragedy, which is the polar opposite of a comedy (This means its totally different in every way). In other words, it is a drama with an unhappy ending. The play was also intended for the Elizabethan theatre, which was arranged in a different way to our theatres nowadays. The stage used to be set out with three different levels, which was perfect for some of the scenes in Romeo and Juliet (e.g. the balcony scene) and there were different areas for the audience to watch the production. There were seats for the more wealthy people and there was a pit for the peasants. Having both the wealthy and the peasants watching the show was good for the performance, because the peasants used to heckle at the actors along with the rich people and they both used to get involved in the play. Shakespeare's plays were written for everyone that wanted to watch them. His plays were not just written for the wealthy. Also the actors were just normal people. The actors were not famous; they had just learnt the lines and put on a performance. 'Romeo and Juliet' is a play not a book, it is meant to be performed not read. ...read more.

Middle

Like the other two events, this event also leads to a chain of events that effect the outcome of the play. After they are invited, Romeo and the other Montagues go to the party and Romeo meets Juliet. Tybalt finds out that the Montagues are there and wants to start a fight, but Capulet will not let him (this builds up even more rage inside Tybalt). Romeo and Juliet fall in love as soon as they meet and arrange to marry the next day. Then Tybalt starts another fight between him and the Montagues. This then leads to Romeo's banishment, which then leads to the death of Romeo and Juliet. There is some dramatic irony, when Peter (wrongly) informs Romeo and the other Montagues to the party. This is because, the audience knows that Peter is not supposed to be informing the Montagues about the party, (because they are the Capulets enemies) but Peter does not. Romeo and Benvolio also know full well that they are not supposed to go, but they go regardless, because Benvolio says that there will be much prettier girls than Rosaline at the party (because Romeo was in love with Rosaline). An example of this is: 'But in that crystal scales let there be weighed Your lady's love against some other maid That I will show you shining at this feast, And she shall scant show well that now seems best. ...read more.

Conclusion

Then Tybalt starts another fight between himself and the Montagues. In this fight Tybalt kills Mercutio and Romeo kills Tybalt. This leads to the banishment of Romeo, which, again leads to the deaths of the star-cross'd lovers". Whenever Tybalt speaks, Shakespeare uses blank verse. He does this because Tybalt is a mean character so he gives him a harsh and sharp type of speech: 'What, drawn and talk of peace? I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee. Have at thee coward!' If this were not done Tybalt would not be made out to be so mean and angry. Using blank verse also gives more effect of the tension building between him and the Montagues. As we progress through the play we notice the build up of dramatic tension Tybalt has with the Capulets. It goes up in stages and ends with a climax (Tybalt's death). So in conclusion I would say that it can be said that the events in Act One, influence the rest of the play and the death of the "star-crossed lovers", enormously. This is because if the main events that I have analysed previously did not happen, then the rest of the play would not have turned out how it did. Each event leads (in one way or another) to the death of the "star-crossed lovers" and therefore influences the rest of the on-going events throughout the play. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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