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To what extent does Bill naughton make Rafe a sympathetic character in 'spring and port wine'

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Introduction

Coursework - Spring and Port wine To what extent does Bill naughton make Rafe a sympathetic character in 'spring and port wine' 1. Intro Around the late 50's early 60's old traditions where still going strong and many people were still following the word of the bible. However this was the 1960's and times were moving very fast, television was popular then ever. People was picking up on the different cultures around the world and in a way young people were rebelling and it was hard for older generation who kept traditional values to convince young people that there way was right. Bill naughton also famous for 'A roof over your head' recognised this and wrote a small play which he broadcasted on BBC radio called 'My flesh my blood', which turned out very popular with the listeners of the BBC. Being so popular he decided to write a full novel on this story called 'spring and port wine'. The play is set in Bolton around about this era and centres around the northern working class family the Cromptons. ...read more.

Middle

3. During dinnertime the meals are served up and the Cromptons are having Herring for tea. However for some reason Hilda doesn't feel like her Herring, so daisy suggests she should fry an egg. But Rafe doesn't like it and makes a scene ' I don't really want my herring if you don't mind' 'No of course not love! What would you like instead? I've got some nice fresh eggs.' 'Aye, with some streaky rashes' 'No, just an egg' 'Sunny side up?' 'Done on both sides. But wait till you've finished, mum' 'Its all right love won't take a minute (raising)' Then Rafe speaks up. 'Hold on a minute mother (To Hilda) is their something wrong with your herring? 'No nothing wrong with it, only I don't feel like it' Rafe then goes on. Here is a few more quotes showing Rafes bad side. 'I'll fry myself an egg mum' 'No, you wont' 'Why not' 'Because this is a home not a cafeteria.' He then goes on to call Hilda some names which scares the audience because they can't understand why he is making such a scene over the herring. ...read more.

Conclusion

After viewing this scene of the play the audience has a total different view to Rafe and they now understand why he acts the way he does and why he is so obsessed about money. 5. After confessing about his past and holding it in for so many years Rafe decides to give Daisy more control over the house keeping, money and finances. He even gives her the keys to his bureau and cash box. 'Here you have the keys' 'Id feel easier in mind if you had them, I would know for certain that you'll never be short.' 6. We have seen Rafe go from an obsessive loan shark to a kind and caring laid back man. He has finally found, what has been deep in his heart to do. He has also come to terms with Hilda being pregnant and stopped her from leaving home to go to London. He has become more relaxed with everybody and he even told Harold to pass the cigarettes around when he lit one up. 'Forgetting your manners son? Pass them round, cant you? But will it last? By Paul Mcgarty 1140 words. ...read more.

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