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To what extent does Branagh pander to the excepted stereo type of the horror genre and to what extent does he remain true to Shelley's intentions in his film 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein?'

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Introduction

To what extent does Branagh pander to the excepted stereotype of the horror genre and to what extent does he remain? true to Shelley's intentions in his film 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein?' Mary Shelley was born in 1797 into the family of William Godwin, a very well known author and philosopher and the very well known feminist, Mary Wollstonecraft. After just eleven days of giving birth to her only child Mary Wollstonecraft died. Mary grew up feeling guilty about her mother's death. Her father and her much-resented stepmother brought up Mary. At sixteen Mary met Percy Bysshe Shelley, a great devotee of her father's teachings. Mary and Percy fell in love very quickly and she agreed to run away with Percy to Calais. At just seventeen Mary and Percy were expecting their first baby together but the baby died of a premature birth. Mary had several children with Percy only one of which survived to adulthood. Mary's older stepsister committed suicide a few years after Mary had ran away and the year after that incident Percy's first wife drowned herself during the pregnancy of Percy's second child. In 1816 Mary and Percy got married. Percy died at the age of twenty-nine as he was at sea in a major storm and his boat crashed leaving Mary penniless with a lot of grief. As Mary became blighted with the many numbers of tragedies she was faced with as she grew up she began to believe very heavily in the role and purpose of having parents to love and look after their children. ...read more.

Middle

Again Branagh manages to set up a very high standard of the horror genre stereotype, lightning flashes through the sky on a dark stormy night, very fast action music is playing into the background whilst Victor runs around his dark attic preparing everything and getting everything into its place with a crazed look in his eyes. When the monster awakens it doesn't seem at all evil or dangerous and seems to resemble a baby, which cannot do anything by itself and relies on Victor to help him stand up. Branagh remained true to Shelley's intentions very well in this scene and has managed to portray it very well when creating the monster as an innocent child which is weak and has to be supported by the more able, which in this case is Victor. When the town's people see the monster they automatically reject him because of his distorted looks; this makes the audience feel a lot of sympathy for the monster because the audience knows that it is not his fault he looks so unnatural. Branagh has managed to portray this very well in his film because he uses things to build up this sympathy such as giving the monster a limp and showing him sleeping in a small alleyway out of sight from people. This is how Shelley intended her audience to feel, she wanted to build up sympathy for the monster and Branagh managed to do this very well. The monster realises that he cannot be around people because of his appearance so he flees out of the town and into a small forest where he finds a little cottage and manages to sneak into the pig shed where he knows the family living there will not see him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Frankenstein refuses to accept the death of his new bride so he takes her back to his laboratory and starts cutting up Justine's body and stitching parts of her and Elizabeth together and revives her so once again we see all the gory bits of limbs being cut up and sewn together, as Elizabeth awakens she realises what Victor has done to her as the monster comes into the laboratory and mistakes her for his bride which victor had promised her, she becomes so angry and upset with the fact that she has been part of Victor 'playing God' she sets herself on fire and runs through the house alighting everything. This scene is again highly over exaggerated, as it is very gory and horrifically unnecessary to the viewer. As Walton and his crew come to burn Frankenstein's body the monster emerges from the distance and is offered by Walton to come with them, this being his first offering of acceptance to mankind, the monster says "he was my father" and decides to set himself alight upon Frankenstein's body so that they burnt together. I think Branagh managed to remain true to most of Shelley's intentions of 'Frankenstein' by portraying the monsters character as a very innocent, childlike character linking it all in very well with Shelley's beliefs she had before and whilst writing 'Frankenstein'. Branagh definitely pandered to the accepted stereotype of the horror genre by showing a lot of close-ups of quite disturbing images and very horrific noises that went with the images that a book can't do. Branagh also used a very wide range of music that managed to fit into all the horrific parts of his film very well. Charlotte Tufnell 10M ...read more.

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