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To what extent is Jane Eyre 'an angel in the house'?

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Introduction

To what extent is Jane Eyre 'an angel in the house'? To a very small extent, Jane Eyre fits into the stereotype of a typical Victorian woman. It is not possible for Jane to be an angel in the house. There are reasons to argue both points, firstly Jane is not the angel in the house because Jane loves books, the angel in the house was supposed to knit clothes, drew, play the piano, entertain the family by singing, and look after her family. Jane is fluent at languages, an angel in the house was educated to a point, not well read, but Jane is very intelligent. There are other reasons for her not fitting into the stereotypical image of an angel in the house; she does not sing, she is feisty, she is strong-minded-she has strong opinions about others, smart, intelligent-she loves reading, and independent-she is free to do what she wants to, and there are many more reasons. ...read more.

Middle

The phrase 'Hold her arms, Miss Abbot: she's like a mad cat', this also suggests that Jane is feisty; and it indicates that Jane is not the angel in the house. 'Unjust! -unjust!', this also indicates Jane being feisty. She very unlike to be the angel in the house. Furthermore, Jane is independent; she is free to do what she likes. 'For one thing, I have no father or mother, brothers or sisters', indicates that she is independent; she has no support from anybody. Furthermore, the phrase 'but I believed in the existence of other and more vivid kinds of goodness, and what I believed in I wished to behold', this also indicates that she is independent. Furthermore, Jane is strong-minded. 'It was quite right, Bessie: your missis has not been my friend: she has been my foe' this suggests that Jane is strong-minded. The phrase 'Tell him to be cautious, sir: let him know what you fear, and show him how to avert the danger' this indicates that Jane is strong-minded. ...read more.

Conclusion

I rushed to his basin and ewer; fortunately, one was wide and the other deep, and both were filled with water. I heaved them up, deluged the bed and its occupant, flew back to my own room, brought my own water-jug, baptized the couch afresh, and, by god's aid, succeeded in extinguishing the flames which were devouring it', this indicates that Jane is a strong woman. The evidence above proves that Jane is not the angel in the house, because she is very different. This differs from the angel in the house because the angel in the house was to be seen and not heard. She was to be a support mechanism for her husband and family, but of course, she was not in charge. She was the 'soul' of the household; always quite and meek, exceptionally modest, beautiful but somehow unaware of it, always willing to sacrifice whatever she must in order to make her family-and especially her husband-happy. The angel in the house was educated to a point, but in music, art and embroidery, and not in science or literature that were the domain of men. ...read more.

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