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Translation of Macbeth's Speech Act I Scene VII, lines 1-28

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Introduction

Translation of Macbeth's Speech Act I Scene VII, lines 1-28 Rampant throughout the play is the concept of "Fair is foul, foul is fair". Basically all that appears good can be bad - the idea that appearances can be deceiving and things are seldom what they seem. At this point in the play Macbeth is toying with the idea of killing the present King, Duncan, so that he may become King. The idea is first presented to Macbeth by three witches, although indirectly, while Macbeth is still a good man, loyal to the King. The prediction that Macbeth is to become king is the one that spawns Macbeth's ambitious and murderous thoughts, Macbeth having already had proof that one part of the witches predictions are true. ...read more.

Middle

In his soliloquy here Macbeth is having second thoughts about the murder of Duncan. After all is the assassination is done and if it were done well, and quickly, then all of Macbeth's ambitions could come true. However killing Duncan means that even though there may be no judgement on earth, there will still be judgement in the afterlife. "If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly. If the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch, With his surcease, success; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all -here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'ld jump the life to come. ...read more.

Conclusion

He should be warding away the very people that think like he is thinking, "Not bear the knife myself". Furthermore Macbeth knows that it is dishonourable to kill a king that is such a good king, when he is in Macbeth's care and when he has no defence and is most vulnerable. By the time Macbeth is finished he has convinced himself that there is nothing to make him do the terrible deed except ambition, which is a like a spur but also like a rider who jumps on a horse but falls off on the other side. Macbeth has almost succeeded in talking himself out of killing the king, he has seen the foul side outweigh the fair side of the act, but is it enough to cork Macbeth's growing desire initiated by evil? ...read more.

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