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Using a Chosen Scene as a Starting Point, Show how J. B. Priestley's Political and Philosophical Beliefs are Reflected in

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Introduction

Using a Chosen Scene as a Starting Point, Show how J. B. Priestley's Political and Philosophical Beliefs are Reflected in "An Inspector Calls" In 1945 J. B. Priestley wrote the play "An Inspector Calls". It is a very tense play; the audience are always on the edge of their seats. It is didactic as it conveys a social and moral meaning to the play. The play has naturalistic conversation all the way through, to make it seem real, like you could be there. But it also has surreal elements; for example; the inspectors name is Inspector Goole. This sounds like a ghoul or a ghost. And at the end of the play, he disappears and his existence remains a mystery. In the play Priestley is making political and philosophical statements. He is offering us, the audience a message; the message that we should think about society; to not split the public into two groups the rich and the poor, to come together as a community. All the characters are responsible for Eva Smiths death, and through her death it shows that everyone is responsible for everyone else and that we should not think that if it doesn't involve us personally, than it is not our problem, because it is. Priestley wrote the play in 1945, but the play itself is set in 1912. I think he did this because they play is set two years before the outbreak of the First World War. ...read more.

Middle

If it didn't end tragically then that's lucky for us. But it might have done." Gerald thinks about it logically and tries to come up with a reasonable explanation to what has just happened. He comes up with the idea that maybe there wasn't really a girl at all. He is trying to remove the blame from them. He is showing the symbolism of hope in the play, saying that there is still hope for them because there is no girl, so the things thy did weren't as bad as they were made out to be, as they didn't drive a girl to suicide. They are not responsible for a girl's death. But he is as much to blame as the others are. He may try to kid himself by thinking that he gave her food when she hadn't eaten for days, kept her over the summer months and allowed her to stay in rooms and gave her money even when the affair had ended. But the truth of the matter is that he used her for a couple of months; he didn't try to help her find employment to get on with her life. In order to take the blame away from himself, he says that there obviously was no girl so they didn't do anything wrong. But what he is not recognising is that they all sill did terrible things to another person. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is obviously not what it was like for Eva Smith/ Daisy Renton. She is a careful worker with a much stronger sense of morals than the Birlings; yet she is condemned to unemployment, and poverty. None of the middle class society helps her and she is eventually driven to suicide. Certainly the play contains a deeply social message; emphasised by an atmosphere of mystery and symbolism. Gradually the emphasis shifts away from the realistic details and the play begins to deal with different issues. The language becomes less realistic and the moral message is more insistent. The inspector gradually becomes the mysterious voice of conscience. He tells the Birling family that men should learn of their responsibility towards of each other. The play shows that the responsibility that a middle class family take is a sham; and that people should take more responsibility. The message for the audience is that they should not only question the Birlings' generation, but also their own. The political message is a very general one. In this play, individual people are criticised. This is to demonstrate that the play declares that we have a responsibility towards one another. People must become more supportive of each other. They must also develop a different concept of social duty. The final message of the play is a plea for change, first a change in human nature, then a change in society. ...read more.

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