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Using Andrew Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress' as your core poem, show clearly, by close textual analysis of at least three poems in total, how this section deals with the concept of Love and as seen through different eyes

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Introduction

Using Andrew Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress' as your core poem, show clearly, by close textual analysis of at least three poems in total, how this section deals with the concept of Love and as seen through different eyes. Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress' is related to the constraints of time and how it will affect the relationship with his partner, in particular love and physical passion. In contrast Lovelace's 'To Althea, From Prison' shows a different kind of love, he is talking about many types of love: the love he has for his wife, the love he has for his fellow royalists, the love he has for his king and ultimately the love he has for his God. Lovelace's poem is about a love without a sexual and physical driving force. Finally, Herrick's 'To the Virgins' is similar in theme to Marvell's 'Coy Mistress' as it too deal with issues of time and how it affects the pace if courtship and marriage. Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress' is made up of three stanza's each with its own purpose. From the poem it seems that Marvell is trying to court a wealthy girl, but she seems to be procrastinating. The purpose of the poem is to convince her to fall in love with him so the can marry and have a physical relationship. The structure of the poem plays a major part in this. The first stanza begins with 'Had' or in other words 'If' meaning this is a hypothesis, which automatically gives the first stanza a subjunctive mood. Marvell is using this stanza to show how much he loves her; however the concern of time is fundamental, which is a reoccurring theme throughout the course of the poem. The poem starts with 'Had we but world enough, and time', this sets up the whole stanza. This opening stanza is a way of Marvell telling his partner how much he really loves her. ...read more.

Middle

Marvell is hoping to resolve the problem. The stanza begins with 'Now' this is the perfect way to open his conclusion and definitive and most crucial stanza. There is a real sense of urgency, he is telling her to commit and consummate their relationship, while she is young, before it is too late 'while the youthful hue / Sits on thy skin'. Marvell is saying if there is a single part of her that wants to have a sexual relationship with him then she must do it. He is telling her to follow her instincts and not to care about what anybody else says. Marvell also believes that she deeply wishes to have a physical relationship with him too: 'And while thy willing soul transpires / At every pore with instant fires,' he is claiming that she wants to have a sexual affiliation, she is desperate to have this deeply passionate bod with him. Marvell tells her she must join him, she must break free of her constraints and do as she wishes which is to marry him so they can have a full and sexual life: 'let us sport while we may' let us have a sexual and intensely passionate relationship while it is possible 'like amorous birds of prey birds of prey were thought to be promiscuous, Marvell is using a simile he is telling her to be promiscuous with him. Marvell is constantly probing her, making her give in to her desires. He is telling her that they should make the most of their time together, he is telling her not to cheat herself out of time with him relish her life, not to be cheated by time. Now, Marvell is concluding his poem he is ensuring that she will join him in matrimony. He speeds up the tempo of the stanza with 'our time devour' he brings about a sense of urgency yet again. Marvel the slows down the stanza on the following line 'Than languish in his slow-chapped power.' ...read more.

Conclusion

'Then be not coy, but use your time, / And while ye may, go marry, / For having lost but once your prime, / You may for ever tarry.' Be not coy is a direct link to Marvell, he is telling her to stop procrastinating. Herrick then uses the exact same argument as Marvell, he tells her not to waste time but to marry him quickly before the prime of her life is over and she is no longer illegible for marriage. Similarly to Marvell, Herrick also stresses the issue of time and how it sneaks up from behind them, 'Old time is still a-flying' time is chasing them and it will eventually catch them up. Herrick imposes the pressure of time by using the sun as a metaphor. 'the sun / The higher he's a-getting, / The sooner the race will be run,'. Herrick is referring to the sun's cycle. Once the sun reaches the highest point or midday, which Herrick is using to signify the girls prime point in her life, the sooner the sun will set or the sooner her life will come to a close. Herrick is telling his love that she needs to make the most of her life because once she has passed a certain stage in her life she will not be able to marry and enjoy herself, To conclude, Marvell and Herrick use their poems to impose the concerns of a lack of time and how it affects their relationships. They both are dealing with partners how are being coy and aren't willing to commit. Both Herrick and Marvell are concerned with having a physical and passionate relationship with their lovers. Lovelace's poem deals with a completely different aspect of love. His love is completely on physical and he is only concerned with showing loyalty and pure spiritual love to his God, his wife, his fellow Royalists and his King. ...read more.

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