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Using your knowledge of the Battle acquired during the trip and by referring to the information provided about the war, explain which interpretation of the Battle you feel is the most accurate.

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Introduction

Using your knowledge of the Battle acquired during the trip and by referring to the information provided about the war, explain which interpretation of the Battle you feel is the most accurate Vimy Ridge was such a valuable place for both sides in the First World War, as the Ridge rose sixty-one metres above the plain and protected an area of France that held very important factories and mines that could be used to make ammunition - contributing to the War effort. The Ridge also covered the junction of the main Hindenburg Line and the defence systems that ran north to the Channel Coast. Source F is an extract showing the conflict as a complete success out of which the Allies have produced a great victory capturing Vimy Ridge from the Germans. ...read more.

Middle

Source F may be inaccurate as the Douai Plain and Lens, the area north of the Ridge, was not captured. This was due to the Germans hiding in the woods and being able to shoot back at the Canadians. Also, the Canadians were not able to get the big guns and artillery up the Ridge as it was far too muddy. Likewise, the battle was not a great success, as the British and French failed to break through either side of the Ridge leaving the Canadians alone. Source G shows the battle at Vimy Ridge as a "senseless action" that has ruined Britain. It states that the battle was lost on the High Command (Generals); who persisted in using heavy artillery and shelling despite it not working effectively. Source G may be correct as it states that the High Command continued with shelling tactics after the Battle at Vimy Ridge, despite them not working effectively. ...read more.

Conclusion

Despite this, Source G was not a "senseless battle" as it was the first battle in the War where the attacking side won. The Allies held Vimy Ridge for the rest of the War. In spring 1918, the Germans attempted to recapture the Ridge but failed when they moved towards Paris. This may have dented the German's confidence knowing that land behind them was in enemies hands; and helped prevent them from capturing Paris. I believe Source G is the more accurate source as it shows the Battle being unsuccessful. The Allies did capture and hold onto the Ridge but they did not progress significantly past this. For example, they moved forward five miles, but in over three years - which is not a great achievement. Also, the Allies failed to capture the area north of the Ridge and they did not break through either side of it, implying that the Battle was not a triumph. This implies that Source G is more precise and therefore more trustworthy. ...read more.

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