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Was Macbeth the architect of his own downfall.

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Was Macbeth The Architect of His Own Downfall I am going to be writing about whether Macbeth was responsible for his downfall or if others played a part in his downfall. Macbeth was a man of moral beliefs. Part of that belief comes with listening to his conscience. In the beginning of the play Macbeth seems to listen to his conscience and does good by what his conscience says, but as the play unfolds Macbeth begins battling with his conscience. As a result he starts hallucinating by having versions of King Duncan's Ghost and the weapon that he used to kill him. " Is this a dagger I see before me?" [Act 1, Scene 1] Also at the beginning of the play we see that Macbeth being influenced by the Witches' prophecies and by Lady Macbeth. Supernatural Belief was much more prevalent in the early 17th century and was not thought of as something unbelievable. ...read more.


Macbeth starts off the story being a completely different person to the one he is come the end of the story. At the beginning he is a strong brave person who is well respected by his fellow countrymen. He has a strong marriage and has many friends and therefore is loved by many. But this is later shadowed by the evil inside, which is released by the Witches. Macbeth is a good person but the Witches reflect the evil in Macbeth. When Macbeth meets up with the Witches at the beginning Banquo dismisses what the Witches have to say whilst Macbeth does the opposite and he listens to the preaching of them. Macbeth takes into account everything the Witches have to say and acts on this. Anything they mention to him he acts on with violence, he becomes too alert with what could happen and he does not think he just acts on instincts. ...read more.


Macbeth is too ambitious to realise that he will die in the final battle. The Witches told him has given him a strong belief in his personal abilities. But when he remembers what the Witches said about Birnam Wood and it actually comes true he nearly gives up hope especially when his wife kills herself. The one thing that keeps him going is that "none of woman born shall harm Macbeth", but when Macduff tells him he "was from his mother's womb untimely ripped", he realises he has no chance of defeating Macduff and he is therefore killed. The Witches played a larger part in the downfall of Macbeth than Lady Macbeth did, but Macbeth's belief in personal abilities puts the greater share of the blame on Macbeth himself. Macbeth's ambition made him blind to the other side of what the Witches had to say. As he was ambitious when things went his way, after the prophecies of the Witches, he made himself believe that he was invincible and refused to think of the consequences of the things he did. Sara Ali-Asghar English - GCSE 2003 ...read more.

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  1. A classical tragedy tells the story of the downfall of a great man.

    She uses several tactics to make her husband comply. First she calls him a coward and says he isn't a true man. She also makes him feel guilty. She tells him she would never break her word to him. Lady Macbeth said she would always keep her word to him even if it meant killing her own baby.

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