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We don't live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other. What is Priestley's main aim in "An Inspector Calls" and how successfully does he achieve it?

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Introduction

We don't live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other. What is Priestley's main aim in "An Inspector Calls" and how successfully does he achieve it? A play wrote by John Boynton Priestley to explore many morals and aspects of human thought and behaviour. "An Inspector Calls," is a play written in 1945 but has been deliberately set in 1912, the reason for this may have been as a way of making the audience look back at their past and would help them engage with the issues of responsibility and guilt emphasized in the play; another reason may have been as the period from 1912 onwards was a time in society that many people wanted to forget. The moral issues that Priestley is trying to convey are those of guilt and responsibility and are sustained throughout the play. ...read more.

Middle

Just like the events in the book Priestley suggests that you can never forget the past it will always be a part of you. Gerald's relationship with Daisy Renton (Eva Smith.) is a very accurate display of Priestley's love life. In 1925 Priestley's wife died, the following year he married Jane Wyndham Lewis a woman who he had been having an affair with and was pregnant with his daughter, you can see the link between this relationship and the one portrayed by Gerald in the play. "An inspector calls," is set in an industrial city of Brumley. The play opens with a conversation between Birling and Gerald. The Birling's are celebrating the engagement of Sheila Birling to Gerald croft, a wealthy businessman with a social status higher than that of the, Birling's. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is ironic since the inspector is there to try and teach them about responsibility towards one another. The first person the inspector decides to question is Arthur Birling. He is the owner of "Birling and company." At the start of the play Birling is described as a "rather portentous man." He was the ex lord mayor and is a potential for the knighthood, this shows us that he has an influential status in society and uses the same influence to later intimidate the professor. When the inspector begins to question him he denies that he knows the girl and has ever met her. Inspector: "Her original name was- Eva smith." Birling: "Eva Smith?" Inspector: "Do you remember her...?" Birling: "No- I seem to remember hearing that name-Eva Smith...but it doesn't convey anything to me." TO BE CONTINUED PLEASE CHECK BACK SOON AS I WILL UPDATE IT IN A DAY OR TWO AS SOON AS MY MEMBERSHIP HAS BEEN RE-INSTATED ...read more.

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