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We feel sorry for Pip in the first chapters of 'Great Expectations'.

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Introduction

Amy Lawrence We feel sorry for Pip in the first chapters of 'Great Expectations' We feel sorry for Pip in the first few chapters of 'Great Expectations' because in the first paragraph we learn Pips full name, which is 'Phillip Pirrip', we learn that he is unable to pronounce his name so that is how he becomes to be known as Pip. We are then told that his parents and five of his siblings have died. When the story begins Pip is visiting the graveyard which is in a bleak lonely landscape on the marsh country. From the death of his parents e gather Pip is an orphan. When Pip is leaving the graveyard he runs into a convict who tells him to get some 'wittles' (food) and a file and if Pip doesn't a young man will take his heart and liver out. We learn that Pip has an older sister called 'Mrs Joe Gargery' who is married to the blacksmith; she teats him very badly she asks him, 'Who brought you up by hand?' this tells you that Pip has not had a good life. Pip becomes to have a guilty conscience becomes he steals a pork pie, a bottle of brandy and the file for the convict while stealing the food Pip wants Mrs Joe to wake up he hears voices in his head saying "Stop Thief"," Wake up Mrs Joe". ...read more.

Middle

We learn that Pip has an older sister who is twenty years older than him. She is like a mother figure to Pip. She is married to `Joe Gargery (blacksmith), his sister treats Pip very badly and is always going on saying "Who brought you up by hand?" When Pip gets home from the graveyard Joe says "Mrs Joe has been out a dozen times looking for you Pip, she even took tickler. (A whip)" After this we see her bullying Pip making him drink a pint of tar water because he was supposed to have been bolting his food but he was taking food for the convict. We see Joe sticking up for Pip at this part so he is also told to drink tar, but only half a pint. We see Pip has a guilty conscience when he takes the food and the file to the convict, while taking the food, Pip hears voices saying "Stop thief" and "Get up Mrs Joe." This is because Pip knows he is doing wrong and he wants Mrs Joe to wake up so then he does not have to go and see the convict, this is because he is most likely scared of the convict and give him the food. ...read more.

Conclusion

We learn that Pip has an older sister who bullies Pip and her husband. When she thinks Pip had been bolting his food down, so she made him drink a pint of tar water. When Pip had arrived home too late she gave him whacks from tickler. This makes you feel sorry for Pip because nowadays parents don't discipline their children in that kind of way. Pip builds a guilty conscience when he is taking the food and drink to the convict, also he believes he can hear voices which make him worried. On the way to the convict, Charles Dickens puts that the gates and dykes and banks come bursting out at Pip through the mist and that the cattle were calling him young thief. Pips sensitivity and imagination runs riot through out the first few chapters. We first meet Pip using his imagination in the graveyard where he is saying what his parents look like through his imagination when he meets Magwitch for the second time and is feeling sorry for him because Magwitch is ill and Pip is trying to give him sympathy. This part also shows the pity for Magwitch. You end up feeling sorry for Pip because he has had a hard life and he doesn't have much behind him, and he hasn't been treated very well in his life so far. ...read more.

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