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What do we learn about the character of Jane Eyre in the first ten chapters of the novel?

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Introduction

GCSE English Literature Coursework Jane Eyre What do we learn about the character of Jane Eyre in the first ten chapters of the novel? Jane has a very strong character and view point; in this novel she tries to put her view point across no matter what the situation or the person. At the beginning of the story when john hit Jane with the book, she immediately responded with attitude and wanted him to know what she really thought of him: "Wicked and cruel boy!" "You are like a murderer- you are like a slave driver- you are like the roman emperors!" Jane is not afraid to express her feeling when she knows she is in the right and something should be done about the situation. Jane is also very truthful and innocent when responding to others, she doesn't try to be anyone else but herself and always tells the truth no matter what people think of her, because when she first met Mr Brocklehurst as he asks her if she ever ...read more.

Middle

Also at Lowood always has to answer back when being disciplined and doesn't really understand that sometime it is necessary to be quiet in certain situations, sometimes Jane doesn't know when to keep her mouth shut and always has to have an opinion when not necessary. Jane has to face an extremely difficult situation in this story, when Helen burns, her best friend is dying. Jane considers death but not as a reality she has a childlike attitude towards death. This is the point where Jane has not fully committed to God and afterlife; this is the difference between both these girls, she has not commited towards God yet in the novel because life hasn't really been on her side where she has lost her parents and is now getting mistreated by her Aunt, she hasn't experienced any love or care from anyone in a while until she met Helen Burns: "She is not going to die; they are mistaken; she could not speak and look so calmly if she were." ...read more.

Conclusion

This is her describing how she felt at this time of her childhood and how she coped with the pressure through the character of Jane Eyre. Victorian attitudes for females were too have children, clean the house, do the cooking and were left uneducated. They were not allowed to go out and work an earn money for the family. In Victorian times they were extremely sexist. This had a huge effect on most of the Victorian ladies an their lives. In this novel Charlotte Bronte put across the point that women can be educated and do more for them than be housewives and rear children. That anyone can be something if they know they can and put their mind to it. Jane is a very strong character, as she made it in life through the tough times and still came out strong and with respect for herself and other people who have treated her with no respect at times. Rebecca Walsh ...read more.

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