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What Do We Learn Of Eddies Character In The Opening Part Of The Play.

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Introduction

What Do We Learn Of Eddies Character In The Opening Part Of The Play Eddie depicts America, because like America he is a contradiction. Reflecting the positive aspect he is loyal, protective and compassionate towards his family, however in contrary he is sometimes misunderstood as insensitive, demanding and overprotecting. From the text we gain an understanding of these numerous characteristics, and Arthur Miller clearly gives us a clear understanding of the contradicting America. From the start of the play it is evident that Eddie speaks in quite a blunt and insensitive tone, which leads our first impressions to believe that this is reflected upon a blunt and insensitive character. He says to Catherine: 'And what happened to your hair?...You look like one of them girls that went to college'. ...read more.

Middle

He explains: 'Believe me, Katie, the less you trust, the less you be sorry'. Arthur Miller gives us an insight into American attitudes in the 1950's, which are paranoid and suspicious, reflected by Eddies negative views of trusting others. Additionally his attitude can seem quite ignorant, which is illustrated where he remarks: 'You don't see nothin' and you don't know nothin'.' Ignorance in the 1950's seems to be an additional aspect which Miller informs us about through Eddie's explanation of the world to Catherine. Additionally this ignorance leads us to forebode illegal actions and misconduct. Additionally his dominating and intimidating tone is shown where he argues with Catherine about her appearance, and says: 'Now don't aggravate me, Katie...I don't like the looks they're giving you in the candy store.' ...read more.

Conclusion

This gives us the opinion that he is quite realistic and protective over his family, and it shows his compassion towards them. Furthermore this illustrates that he is misunderstood and, like America, he is a contradiction, because deep inside he is compassionate and realistic, but he shows himself to be a 'real man' and 'machismo', which sometimes leads us to have a misguided impression of him'. America is depicted by Eddie because he expresses himself to be 'machismo', but, like America, he is a contradiction, and this is shown where we see him to be protective and compassionate towards his family. His ignorant and suspicious views reflects circumstances of Americans in the 1950's, but in contrary he is realistic and tries to provide Catherine with a well - maintained future. Homework 'A View From The Bridge' Monday 3rd November 2003 Ravi Dewji 11S ...read more.

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