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What do we learn of the role played by Crooks in the text?

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Introduction

What do we learn of the role played by Crooks in the text? In your answer you should refer to the wider context of the text. Crooks is introduced in the beginning of the text as the ?stable buck? of the ranch, and one feature of him that is highlighted significantly is the way in which he is addressed by the others on the ranch, often with derogatory references. Crooks is placed in a setting in which he is the only black man of the ranch, and because the text is set in a time where racism was prominent, he is often discriminated against. Candy describes the boss as ?[giving] him hell when he?s mad?, despite Candy himself describing Crooks as a ?nice fella? with a ?crooked back?. ...read more.

Middle

One example of Crooks standing up for his rights is shown when Crooks shows enough pride to demand Curley?s wife to leave his bunk: ??I had enough, he said coldly. ?You got no rights comin? in a coloured man?s room??. However this short burst of pride and independence, like many other people?s, is quickly reversed when Curley?s wife threatens to falsely accuse him of committing a crime which would ultimately see Crooks lynched, and Crooks quickly withdraws by ?reducing himself to nothing?. Crooks also represents mankind in another way by the fact that he revels in taunting Lennie, suggesting that like many others, he has also been broken inside and feels the need to have power over someone else. ...read more.

Conclusion

His withdrawal from participating in the dream also serves as another warning that the dream is likely to be crushed, when he changes his mind saying that he was ?Jus? foolin??, and ?Wouldn?t want to go no place like that?. This change from his previous willingness to participate in the dream also again represents the cycle in which Crooks is able to exert his willpower and use his independence, only to withdraw soon afterwards. The continuous cycle of this relates to the struggles of man during the depression era, and strongly links to the Dream as the Dream becomes something that at times seems close, while at other times seems impossible. ...read more.

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