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What do Wilfred Owens poems reveal about his views on religion?

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Introduction

19/05/06 What do Wilfred Owens poems reveal about his views on religion? I am writing this essay to explain the problems Wilfred Owen had with mankind and not religion. Wilfred Owen was born in 1893 and lived to die at the age of twenty-one. He was a great poet but he had a big problem with mankind. Most of the poems he wrote included the terrible incidents of the war. Wilfred Owen fought in the war for four years. During those horrible years, he wrote a considerable amount of poems about the war. Many of them being religious based like the Parable of the old man and the young. This poem was originally a religious parable about how Abraham was told by God to kill his son. Abraham was about to kill his son when an angel appeared and offered a ram instead of his son. ...read more.

Middle

"...even the brambles would not yield..." This quote is from 'Spring Offence,' it explains how even the brambles tried to stop the British soldiers. "By his dead smile, I knew we stood in hell." This quote explains that all wars, even small, are horrific. Wilfred Owen is stood over a man, nearly dead, and is watching his smile. He then realised that his smile meant they were all standing in hell. Hell is thought to be the home of the Devil, the dark, dank, rotting underworld of all life. I think this is precisely why Wilfred Owen depicted the First World War as being Hell. "Foreheads of men have bled where no wounds were." This quote, from 'Strange Meeting' explains how the minds of British, and probably German soldiers to, were broken or destroyed by the war. Shell shock is one of these that most soldiers got. ...read more.

Conclusion

"...made myself ready to sustain war..." Canto 1. "And tighten them for battle." Spring Offence. These two quotes are both very similar. The first quote comes form Dante's Inferno, the second comes from Spring Offence. They both explain how they are getting ready for war. As Dante's Inferno is based in hell, it shows that war is mostly founded by hell itself. "The old lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patri mori." This quote is from 'Dulce Et Decorum Est.' It means, 'It is good and fitting to die for your country.' Wilfred Owen depicted this as a lie because he thought is was not good and fitting to die for your country in such a horrible way through the war. I conclude that Wilfred Owens views on religion were quite high as he based most of his war poems on hell. Also, I think his views on religion were quite high as he wondered why God would let the war commence through humanities mistakes with the world. ...read more.

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