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What do you think of the way Lord Capulet behaves in Act 3 Scene 5 and what do the audience learn about his character?

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Introduction

22nd of September 04 Rachel Wardhaugh Shakespeare Coursework "And you be mine, I'll give you to my friend; And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, for by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee..." What do you think of the way Lord Capulet behaves in Act 3 Scene 5 and what do the audience learn about his character? Lord Capulet's behaviour is seen as particularly important as it changes dramatically through Act 3 Scene 5. This scene shows a contrast in Lord Capulet's personality and how he reacts to other characters in this scene, most especially Juliet. The scene brings about violence and an ultimatum from Lord Capulet which leads to tragedy. A chain of events start which embark on the beginning of the end. There is symbolism at the opening of the scene which represents light and darkness; this escalates tension in the opening scene. The references to light personify purity and life and innocence. These are the references to Lord Capulet's sensitive side. However the references to dark are symbolic to the death and hatred in his character and could also represent the tragedy in the play. ...read more.

Middle

It is very crucial. On hearing this from Juliet, Lord Capulet is very discontented. His attitude and personality change even more dramatically. He demands that Juliet will marry Paris, he tells Juliet that he will drag her to the church and insults her, "And yet 'not proud', mistress minion, you" The language used by Lord Capulet when he is angry is very short and the exclamation marks and absence of full stops indicate to us that he is not stopping to catch his breath. It is quite aggressive and would obviously upset Juliet even more than she already is. This also helps to lead to the tragedy to come about in the play. Lord Capulet uses insulting words and puts orders forward to Juliet. He is not going to give up. Lord Capulet uses repetition of ordering Juliet to go to church to marry Paris. If Juliet does not go and does not marry Paris then Lord Capulet is going to disown her, "I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday, Or never after look me in the face". Juliet has to do as he says or else. This is a problem for Juliet as she will be disowned and left for dead on the streets with nothing. ...read more.

Conclusion

He is a hypocrite as he can give orders to Tybalt but he doesn't think the rules apply to him an example is fighting. In Act 3 scene 5 Paris asks for Juliet's hand in marriage. Lord Capulet tells Paris to wait another couple of years but then a couple of days later he changes his mind. Also in Act 1 scene 5 Lord Capulet reacts violently to Tybalt at the ball. He calls Tybalt "saucy" this means impetuous. This shows that Lord Capulet has a split personality; he can be either pleasant or vile towards people. In conclusion I think Lord Capulet has some justification for the way in which he acts and the contrast in his personality. He can be complicated and complex with a violent or caring side to him. I think a modern day audience would react differently to the way he acts than a 16th Century audience would as people behaved more that way than they do in modern day. Daughters such as Juliet have more freedom to choose what to do with their life in most cultures at the present time. The audience in this scene learn a lot about Lord Capulet's character and how he behaves to certain things which happen in life although a modern day audience would interpret his actions different to a 16th Century audience. ...read more.

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