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What does 'Of Mice and Men' reveal about the circumstances in which men like George and Lennie live, and the conditions in which they work?

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Introduction

WHAT DOES 'OF MICE AND MEN' REVEAL ABOUT THE CIRCUMSTANCES IN WHICH MEN LIKE GEORGE AND LENNIE LIVE, AND THE CONDITIONS IN WHICH THEY WORK? The book shows the two men, George and Lennie, travelling from working ranch to working ranch. Though they are travelling because Lennie is always getting them into trouble and they keep on having to run away to somewhere far. They keep on travelling, like typical workmen, they work somewhere for a short while then they pack there bags and leave. They don't get attached to anyone they meet; they know that as soon as they become good friends with someone they will have to leave, and say goodbye. They also known that they will be forgotten as soon as they leave and someone will come along and fill there place. The life that they lead, is common, all these men share a 'dream', the 'American Dream', where they will save up enough money to buy their own small farm, this dream offers them a future where they can be their own men, working for themselves and be independent. ...read more.

Middle

Then they go on Monday morning, before the work starts, and no-one can stop them. He knew that they had actually come to work, because they came on a Friday. George and Lennie, have circumstances like many others, they don't have a family. Lennie used to have an Aunt called Clara, but she died. George promised her that he would look after him, keep him out of trouble. Apart from Lennie's Aunt Clara they didn't have any family or they had left them behind, they were long forgotten. Some did and they were only working because they needed to send money home to feed their family, also some would frequently write letters to other people. Most miners, in less they stay in the same place and don't keep on blowing of their money, are quiet poor. This is because they get a monthly wage, and on the first couple of weekends they go into town and spend their money. Also because many of them kept on travelling, by time they got to the next ranch they were out of money, because they would spend a lot of money on travelling. ...read more.

Conclusion

if Candy did buy the house with him, it would not be the same, because all the dream of rabbits and the childish behaviour of Lennie would not be there. Now George must live without him and travel by himself. He will feel the need to tell someone off, and act superior to someone. Also the place they lived were small and cramped, they all lived together and would play cards at night. The nigga had to live separate because he was a nigga, and no-one liked him. If anything bad would happen to the nigga it would be justified as 'it was the nigga' and this could and would seem as a perfectly good excuse. No-one was allowed in his room, and he would then in turn try to kick out anyone that walked in. The book reveals how Lennie and George were like so may other men at time. Their circumstances were like so many other itinerant workers because of the type of life they live and the way they constantly travelled, not only because of Lennie's problem, but also in search for the 'American Dream'. Varun Garg 5D: Coursework: Of Mice and Men Page 1 of 2 ...read more.

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