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What does the reader learn about detective stories and life in Victorian England through their reading of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle?

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Introduction

What does the reader learn about detective stories and life in Victorian England through their reading of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle? Consider the following... * The conventions of Detective stories. * The characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr.Watson. * The narrative structure of the Sherlock Holmes stories. * The social and historical setting of the stories. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh on 22 May 1859, he died in 1930. He printed his first Sherlock Holmes book, "A Study in Scarlet" in 1887 in Beeton's Christmas Annual. Sherlock Holmes soon became very popular amongst the people of their day, People immediately fell in love with Sherlock Holmes for several reasons. One of the main reasons was because he was a detective and detectives were new at the time, the police were very incompetent at doing their jobs. The public were very insecure, they knew the police were absolutely useless. ...read more.

Middle

Back then the old "Ball 'n' Chain" really was the Ball 'n' Chain for women, once they were married they were basically considered, in my opinion, baby making machines or trophies, something you had around the house that's sole purpose was to look happy or pretty. Men didn't consider that their wives had feelings or desires, that there was something behind the smiles, women, like men actually wanted to be something and not just watch other people get there. That's one of the reasons why women came to visit Sherlock Holmes to ask for help, he was a gentleman. Victorian England had a very interesting setting to it, dark streets, opium dens, markets etc. The opium dens being one of the places in Victorian England that was considered somewhere were everyone went to smoke their troubles away, opium dens, evolved into regular bars, where people go to drink their troubles of the day away. Opium dens were generally dark settings where mysterious figures would be hidden in dark corners, away from the people, Opium dens were considered indecent back then. ...read more.

Conclusion

"The Man with the Twisted Lip", is an example of a main plot hinted at from the start by Watson's involvement in a parallel story which begins the narrative; "The Empty House". The similarities start with Watson attempting to make sense of a muddled crime, this leads to Holmes who then solves the crime very easily, a way for him to "Come Back". Another feature that adds depth to the stories making them seem more substantial than mere short narrative stories is Watson's habit of referring to other cases from time to time, the stories sort of hang together like a biography of Holmes, a few chapters missing - we regard them as a collection. Conventional detective stories always have a hero, in this case the hero is Holmes, and a faithful sidekick who would die for the hero, Watson. The hero always sits and waits for someone or a "damsel in distress" to explain her troubles, the hero then ventures out into the wild with his sidekick and does all he possibly can to solve the problem! ...read more.

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