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What does this scene show us about Macbeth and Lady Macbeth? Language?

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Introduction

Macbeth Act 3 Scene 2 Question 1: What does this scene show us about Macbeth and Lady Macbeth? Language? This scene starts with Lady Macbeth sending a servant to bring her husband to he. While she is waiting for Macbeth, she discloses her concern for the worrying Macbeth and his fears. In her own soliloquy, she says, "Tis safer to be that which we destroy than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy." This means that she knows that her husband is too fearful to gain any pleasure from the being King, and she wants to try and calm him down. She is still the practical advice giver like in the other act. When Macbeth arrives, she asks him, "Why do you keep alone of sorriest fancies your companions making? ... What's done is done." Macbeth explains that they have wounded the snake, not killed it. He here admits to growing fears of retribution for his actions. ...read more.

Middle

For example he says that the seeling night should come, meaning that the day would be covered, and also with a scarf meaning that day would be hidden meaning it would be night. And that is the time he is waiting for. Next he talks about nights black agents to their pray do rouse, meaning the murderers, as they are going to kill Fleance and Banquo at night. So now he basically sounds evil, like Lady Macbeth was earlier, and also uses words that the witches might use, and so he sounds evil and possessed by power. And being power hungry. Question 2: How have they changed from earlier on in the play? This short scene reveals a great deal about the relationship of the king and queen at this point in the play. Lady Macbeth, although still practical about their state of affairs, appears more kind and concerned than in previous scenes. She seems genuinely worried about Macbeth's worrying for two reasons that are partially selfish; she knows he is finding no joy in his new position because of his fear and this, now makes her feel unhappy. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is important to see that Macbeth has plotted the murders of Banquo and Fleance by himself without the help of his wife, who was the plotter and planner of Duncan's murder. In fact, he does not even share his plans with her. He says he wants her to be "innocent of the knowledge," so maybe this is so that she does not feel anymore frightened and scarred, but in Macbeth's current state of mind, he has perhaps even begun to distrust his wife. There is certainly a new distance between them that Lady Macbeth has recognized. Although the scene between husband and wife, now the king and queen, is pleasant on the surface, I think there is now a division between them that can now be seen. Macbeth is now operating his plans on his own, the true royal tyrant. He seems to no longer need his wife's input as he did earlier, and the result is that he is hurling himself into even greater chaos at an alarming rate. Abbas Lightwalla ...read more.

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