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"What dramatic techniques does Arthur Millar use to build tension in Act 1?"

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Introduction

Saniyya Abrahams 11 Wilson Literature Coursework- 20th Century Drama "What dramatic techniques does Arthur Millar use to build tension in Act 1?" INTRODICTION In this essay I am going to analyse the dramatic techniques that Arthur Millar uses in his 20th century drama called, 'A View From The Bridge.' The play is set in Brooklyn in the 1940's when the Italians were immigrating to America to find work as they were poor and they needed to get away from Italy to find work to feed their families in Italy. Many of these immigrants entered America Illegally. The play is about a skilled docks worker in Brooklyn named Eddie Carbone. Eddie lives with his wife Beatrice and their niece, Catherine. Beatrice's cousins named Marco and Rodolfo come to America from Italy to find work to feed Marco's family in Italy, as they are very poor. They plan to enter illegally. Eddie has feelings for his niece Catherine that he should not have. ...read more.

Middle

For example, Alfieri uses terms such as 'Machine Gun.' The effect of using a term like this is to create tension for the audience, as they now know that something bad is going to happen later on in the play. As the play progresses the audience realise that this is the only time when Alfieri uses negative and violent language. So his words take on a deeper meaning when the audience realises this. I am now going to look at Eddie's language in the first act. His speech is simple but at the start of the play his words are more vibrant towards Catherine as he tells he that she is "walking wavy." At the same time he also refers to her as a "Madonna." This gives the audience the idea that she is pure and she is a virgin and Eddie wants her to stay as she is. " Listen, B., she'll be with a lot of plumbers? ...read more.

Conclusion

I wouldn't do nothing about that, I mean-'' This is ironic because Eddie is disgusted by the thought of him betraying his own family but Eddie will betray his family later on in the play. Some other parts release tension after a tense moment. For example Eddie, Catherine and Beatrice were having a conversation about Spiders "Just be sure there's no spiders in it will ya?" Millar has put this dialogue in deliberately to release tension after the tense moment of the waiting for the cousins. In the dialogue between Eddie, Marco and Rodolfo. Eddie is very provocative. STAGE DIRECTIONS CHARACTERS ACTIONS. PROPS AND LIGHTING Another dramatic technique I am going to analyse is the way the props and lighting are used in the play. There is a telephone booth and Alfieri's desk. These will build tension later on in the play ecspcially the telephone booth. " there is also a telephone booth..." As this is a stage prop it will be used later on in the play in act two but it will build tension throughout the first act and the first part of the second act. This is because the ...read more.

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