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What factors lead to Lennie's death, and what is their importance in terms of the structure of this novel? "Of Mice and Men".

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Introduction

What factors lead to Lennie's death, and what is their importance in terms of the structure of this novel? There are many factors, throughout the novel "Of Mice and Men" that lead to the death of Lennie. These factors also lead to how the book is structured. The objective of John Steinbeck, who wrote this book, was to convey fragility of life in the 1930's in the area of Salinas. The Scottish poet Robbie Burns wrote a poem including the line: "The best laid plans of mice and men..." This poem is a bout a mouse, who's home is ruined by a farmer ploughing a field. The mouse then dies over the winter, having no protection. This is a literary allusion, as Burn's mouse parallels George and Lennie's dream, which inevitably will never be achieved. ...read more.

Middle

This is shown in chapter four, when the other ranch workers have gone out to a whorehouse, they have left the 'rejects' (Lennie, Crooks, Curly, and Candy's Wife): "'Ever'body went into town,' he said, 'Slim an' George an' ever'body. George says I gotta say here an' not get into no trouble...'" The second factor to lead to Lennie's death, are Curley's wife character, and her nature. This shows isolation, as she has no friends on the ranch, and even her husband owns her, as she is only known as Curley's Wife. She seeks attention, through appearing in the bunkhouse: "Both men glanced up for the rectangle of sunshine in the doorway was cut off." Curley's wife is attracted to Lennie's petting tendencies, showing she is soft, and although jailbait, is also purity: "Curley's wife laughed at him. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, I feel that the main factor that led to Lennie's was in fact Steinbeck's fundamental message. Also, intolerance, and misunderstanding in society did not help Lennie, as he has been given no place, and people don't know how to treat Lennie, as he is so misunderstood. The structure, also lead to Lennie's death. We see his death as inevitable, due to the main title of the novella, and also how it is organised. Lennie's death was not unexpected, especially when we have read the last chapter, with Lennie's visions. The giant rabbit tells us that Lennie has done wrong, and that he will be punished for it, by not having George and his dream ranch, and him tending the rabbits. These factors all point, very obviously throughout the novel, so I believe that that it was too predictable. ...read more.

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