• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What Factors Lead to Lennies Death and What is their Importance in Terms of Structure in the Novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What Factors Lead to Lennies Death and What is their Importance in Terms of Structure in the Novel? The beginning , or near beginning of "Of Mice and Men" , starts at a quiet pool in the secludedness of the Salinas Valley. It is a peaceful scene, contrasting with the previous episode in which George and Lennie found themselves fleeing from an angry mob. While in the peacefulness of their temporary refuge , Lennie insists that George tell him about "the rabbits" and "how I get to tend the rabbits". George does so with slight fatigue at the monotonousy of the repeated subject. "All right , but after this you get some rest , you hear?" . The proceeding story is on of glamour, an idyllic dream with the harshness of life carefully cut out. Goerge tells the story as if talking to a child, and Lennie responds with the same child-like ideas. "Tell them about the rabbits George" . Lennie even eagerly adds to the far-fetched fantasy with child like enthusiasm, "and we have different coloured rabbits George." ...read more.

Middle

Lennie , however , lacks that intuition, and has very little in the sense of propriety that would be seen as 'wise'. Because of this , Lennie is drawn into a fixation with Curleys wife. Like a child , Lennie is obsessed easily with what he finds as visually pleasing. Anything aesthetically or sensually pleasing ( eg. Touch, feel), Lennie instantly wants to keep it or 'pet' it. "Shes purty George". Lennies child like state of mind is his weakness. It renders him innocent, failing him in trying to comprehend the harshness and formality of the surrounding world. Like a toddler, he seeks protection . He is reclusive towards strangers and inept to handle a confrontation. He does however posses odedience, as is shown repeatedly throughout the novel. One example of Lennies obedience is when , in a moment of anger , George tells Lennie to jump into a river ,even in the knowledge that Lennie couldn't swim. "An I said ' go on , jump in' and by hell he did, stupid bastard couldn't even swim". ...read more.

Conclusion

In a belated reaction , George orders Lennie to release Curley , but , yet again like a child , Lennie reacts as any child would in fear , he freezes. " Let 'im go Lennie!" Again and again George tries to prise Curleys hand free from Lennies iron grip ,but fails. After a minute or so, Lennies fear subsides enough for his sense of self to tell him to 'let go'. While not fatal in this instance , Lennies lack of self control under pressuring and climactic situations is deadly. Lennies great strength is only hindered by his mild nature . However , when either angered or frightened , Lennies self control goes 'out the window'. Near the end of the novel , Lennies lack of self control proves to be fatal to not only him , but the wife of Curley aswell. In conclusion then , Lennie is utterly unprepared for the world. George is the only person who understands him and like wise , who Lennie understands. Lennies lack of propriety and self control result in his death. An all but too kind a death , for one so inept to cope with the world. By Kerry Byrne ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE John Steinbeck section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work