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What features of Jane Eyre can be considered gothic?

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Introduction

Irana Tarling English Coursework What features of Jane Eyre can be considered gothic? Gothic: � Adjective 1: Relating to the ancient Goths or their extinct language. � Adjective 2: Of the style of architecture prevalent in Western Europe in the 12th-16th centuries, characterised by pointed arches and elaborate tracery. � Adjective 3: Portentously gloomy or horrifying. � Adjective 4: (of lettering) Derived from the angular style of handwriting with broad vertical down strokes used in medieval Western Europe. � Noun 1: The language of the Goths. � Noun 2: Gothic architecture. Description Gothic novels were introduced in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They are typical horror stories. They are tales of the supernatural, full of clich�s about haunted castles, ruined abbeys and graveyards landscapes. The characters are stereotypical people; the hero is young, and handsome battling the villains to gain his bride, the heroine is also young and beautiful, and is a victim until her handsome priest comes and saves her. The villain is often a relative of the heroine, and will do anything to get what he wants. Ghosts and monsters haunt the places in the novel, and the minds of the characters. The pathetic fallacy is used to create atmosphere and suspense - storms to show sadness and anger, and sun to show happiness. ...read more.

Middle

Mr. Rochester is the master of Thornfield hall. He seems withdrawn and thoughtful but eventually Jane sees through this and they become engaged. He is a serious and stern man. He is already married, but his wife is crazy, and he keeps her locked in his house, and he tries to get sympathy from Jane. His wife sets fire to the house, and she is killed, and Mr. Rochester is left blinded, although he eventually regains some of his sight. He is the hero of the story, although he is not a handsome prince, but he falls in love with Jane and tries to help her, all the time harbouring his secret wife. Mrs. Fairfax is the housekeeper at Thornfield hall. She is welcoming, and she and Jane become quite close. She looks out for Jane and warns her to be careful about getting to close to Mr. Rochester. Adele Varens is the girl that Jane has to look after at Thornfield School. Jane looks after the girl well, and teaches her English. Grace Poole is a servant at Thornfield, and is an alcoholic. Jane thinks that she is the responsible for the laugh and for trying to kill Mr. Rochester, and Mr. ...read more.

Conclusion

This makes Jane feel even more withdrawn and plain than she did before. The attack showed the viciousness of Bertha - her comments about sucking Mr Mason's blood emphasise that. The description of Jane's thoughts and feelings show the fright that she is feeling, even though it seems as if she remains very calm. Jane's wedding: Jane is excited about getting married to Mr. Rochester although she is not sure how she feels. The wedding is destroyed when Mr. Mason tells the priest about Bertha, and Jane is shown her. This is similar to a gothic novel in some ways, because Bertha (the bad element) has destroyed Jane's happiness, which is a normal gothic tale, but at the same time it is not, as there is no one to help Jane get through, and nothing she can do. Also Bertha is not directly responsible, as it is her brother who causes the story to come out. Jane and Mr Rochester ending together: Jane goes back to Thornfield to find Mr. Rochester, only to discover that there had been a fire and Bertha had been killed, and Mr. Rochester had lost the use of his sight, and his hand. She immediately accepts this and decides to look after him. They marry. This shows Jane's strength of character and also Mr. Rochester's weakness, as he is self-pitying and relies on Jane for strength. ...read more.

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