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What forms of love do the characters in Romeo and Juliet illustrate?

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Introduction

What forms of love do the characters in Romeo and Juliet illustrate? "Here's much to do with hate but more with love", (act 1 scene1 line 169). Although this is only one line from the play it virtually concludes the whole play and sums up the whole story. It shows that the play is not solely about love but also a lot of hatred is involved in the play. However, as the quotation suggest, the play is "more" to do with the power of love. There are many different types of love explored; you can see representations of bawdy love; sexual love; romantic love; family love; brotherly love and motherly and fatherly love. Out of all the different types of love explored in the play the love between Romeo and Juliet is the only true love. You can see love expressed in many different ways. Romeo has a very affectionate type love for Juliet and is not scared to show his feelings, he is very passionate. ...read more.

Middle

Mercutio has a very jokey attitude towards love and when he is describing Romeo's love for Juliet he uses sexual innuendos, puns and frequent bad language. Mercutio says, "O Romeo, that she were, O that she were an open-arse, thou a pop'rin pear!" Mercutio is being very rude here, he is comparing a lady's vagina to a fruit, ripe and ready to burst open with juice. He also mocks Romeo soon after he has met Juliet as he assumes Romeo is still in a relationship with Rosaline and that it is sexual. Mercutio recites this poem, "An old hare hoar, is very good meat in lent; But a hare that is hoar, Is too much for a score, When it hoars ere it to be spent." This basically means that a prostitute is a prostitute but if she's an ugly prostitute then she's not even worth paying for. Whereas Romeo is in a more dream-like state, Juliet has both feet on the ground. Juliet's love for Romeo is a strong, romantic and passionate love. ...read more.

Conclusion

Paris worships Juliet from afar like a courtly lover. It is not true love, it is similar to the love which Romeo had for Rosaline in the start of the play. He is in love with the idea of being in love. Paris thinks that he is the right man for Juliet as he has status, wealth and money. Paris acts as a suitor ought to act. He does not share the same passion that Romeo feels but respects Juliet and he is well respected by both Juliet and Juliet's father Capulet. It is an arranged love that Paris has for Juliet, it is not a true one, although Paris does have feelings for Juliet but does not feel that it is appropriate to show them as he says, "These times of woe afford no times of woo". Paris does not feel it is the right time to express his emotions but later in the play when he finds out about Juliet's love for Romeo he says, "Poor soul, thy face is much abus'd with tears." Paris is deeply upset, he feels betrayed by Juliet. ...read more.

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