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What impact does the beginning of the novel have a modern audience? You should focus on the first ten chapters when Jane Eyre moves from childhood to adult hood and show an awareness of any social or historical influences on the author.

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Introduction

What impact does the beginning of the novel have a modern audience? You should focus on the first ten chapters when Jane Eyre moves from childhood to adult hood and show an awareness of any social or historical influences on the author. 'Jane Eyre' is a book that is written in a way that draws the reader into Jane's life and emotions. At the beginning of the book, we see nineteenth century life through a child's eyes. Jane is not treated kindly or with love and because of this we see how awfully some children were treated in the nineteenth century, so very different to our world today where that would be unacceptable to treat a child badly, this impacts the reader dramatically. The author, Charlotte Bronte was similar to the character she invented, subsequently she found it easy to express Jane's emotions and thoughts. ...read more.

Middle

The chief disadvantages lie in the difficulty of presenting an objective portrait. this affects the reader as it is written in first person the reader has a lot more empathy and this limits the point of view to Jane's point of view unlike an omniscient author. This is very different to many books, which are written now but set in the past where the author has to research many of the issues and language of that day and age. Subsequently Jane Eyre interests readers because of its historical context, it allows the reader an insight in to what life was like during the 19th century. Her life at Lowood impacts the modern day reader. Maria was far superior to any of her playfellows and companions, and yet she had faults so annoying that she was in constant disgrace with her teachers and an object of merciless dislike to one of them, who is depicted as Miss Scratchard in Jane Eyre, hence came Helen burns and exact transcript of Marie Bronte. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another aspect of Charlotte Bronte's stly that occasionally arouses affectionate amusement is her habit of asking rhetorical questions and the addressing the reader directly: 'And where, meantime, was Helen Burns?..... Had I forgotten her?.... Surely the Mary Ann Wilson I have mention was inferior to my first acquaintance.....True, reader, and I knew and felt this...One may dislike Charlotte Bronte's occasional inflation of language, and we may laugh at her confiding manner, but too much significance are attached to them. The work itself is noble and powerful a few faults cannot seriously weaken it. The nobility and power of her prose are unquestionable. She knows what she wishes to convey and finds precise and eloquent words in which to say it. To decide whether this was the case for many modern day readers, as a class we were given a piece of text from Jane Eyre and were told to underline words which we didn't understand. The words were as following: reproved, wantonly, opprobrium, precocious, transitory, oppression expedient etc. ...read more.

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