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What is the importance of Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird"?

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Introduction

What is the importance of? Scout Harper Lee writes the novel To Kill a Mockingbird from the retrospective view of a young Scout who narrates the events from her childish view. This allows for a more impartial interpretation as she is still developing her beliefs of right and wrong and so will lack the more biased view of an adult. The character of Scout helps point out the key themes of prejudice and social expectations, whilst exploring the idea of growth and maturity as well as the difference between what a person appears to be and what they really are. The most prominent asset of Scouts character, her nativity, allows the author a way to subtly rebel against aspects of Southern Society. ...read more.

Middle

Lee demonstrates aversion to the system by pointing out how it restricts children from excelling. The sarcasm of "received these impressionistic revelations in silence" is a deliberate demeaning of the system as it highlights how basic the teaching is and inappropriate in the sense that with young children, in particular, learning is done through interaction and communication. Scout serves as a bridge for the author to relay to her readers her importance given to education that allows people to excel rather than conform to a general societal level. A following encounter with the education system sheds light on the hypocrisies of Southern society. Scout's teacher speaks of ?prejudice? within Germany towards the Jews and says that there is none in America, however just after the court ruling, Scout overheard her saying how in reference to the negroes "someone needed to finally puts them in their place". ...read more.

Conclusion

Scouts observations reveal the distinction between appearance and reality. At the beginning of the novel the reader is given the impression that Boo Radley is a ?malevolent Phantom? due to his isolation, with negative connotations that provoke a psychological unrest, as the story develops Boo Radleys benevolent nature is demonstrated by his knot-hole gifts in the form of ?two pieces of chewing gum?. Similarly a miss judgment is made of Atticus by the children in thinking he is weak and old with ?grey hairs? starting to appear followed by showing he is quite capable when he shoots the rabid dog and has the name of ?one shot Finch?, however it is his modest manners and gentlemanliness that gain most respect from his community and Scout acknowledges this when she states that her father is ?the bravest man that ever lived? after a meeting with the accusatory Mrs Dubose. ...read more.

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