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What is the role of Inspector Goole?

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What is the role of Inspector Goole? Inspector Goole is one of the main characters in an inspector calls. On entrance in to the play he is described as "an impression of massiveness, solidity and purposefulness. He is a man in his fifties, dressed in a plain darkish suit. He speaks carefully, weightily and has a disconcerting habit of looking hard at the person he addresses before actually speaking." He works very systematically; he likes to deal with "one person and one line of enquiry at a time." His method is to confront a suspect with a piece of information and then make them talk - or, as Sheila puts it, "he's giving us the rope - so that we'll hang ourselves." ...read more.


"Any reason why I shouldn't see this photo inspector." Said Gerald. This adds suspense to the play as it makes the audience wonder whether it is actually the same girl the inspector is interviewing the Birling family about. Another way the role of the inspector adds suspense to the play is how he seems to know an extraordinary amount about Eva Smith even though she only died a couple of hours ago. Shelia tells Gerald "of course he knows." He knows these things are going to happen- He says "I'm waiting... To do my duty" just before Eric's return, as if he expected Eric to reappear at exactly that moment. Another role of the inspector is how he is the voice of the socialist views that J.B. ...read more.


Everyone is a part of "one body", the Inspector sees society as more important than individual interests. The views he is propounding are like those of Priestley who was a socialist. He adds a clear warning about what could happen if, like some members of the family, we ignore our responsibility: "And I tell you that the time will soon come when, if men will not learn that lesson, when they will be taught it in fire and blood and anguish." Probably he is thinking partly about the world war they had just lived through - the result of government's blindly pursuing 'national interest' at all costs. No doubt he was thinking too about the Russian revolution in which poor workers and peasants took over the state and exacted a bloody revenge against the aristocrats who had treated them so badly. ...read more.

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