• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What kind of effects does the language achieve in Sylvia Plath’s ‘Medallion’?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What kind of effects does the language achieve in Sylvia Plath's 'Medallion'? The 'Medallion' is about a dead snake that appears, by the description, at first, to be alive. 'The bronze snake lay in the sun', this portrays the picture of a beautiful creature basking in the sun. 'Inert as a shoelace' tells us that the snake is lifeless as well as motionless, and also that the snake is very small. 'Dead but pliable still', this is when we are actually told that the snake is dead, but only recently killed/died as it's joints can still be moved - 'pliable still'. ...read more.

Middle

'Vermilion' is a very bright red usually used by artists, this poem is very much seen through a painter's eye, lots of contrasts and ideas are depicted through unusual colours (specially for painting) and environments or scenery containing lots of vivid colour, especially the shades of fire and light to that effect. 'Ignited', 'flame' and 'light' resemble the life that appears to be there. The phrase 'Ignited with a glassed flame' is a metaphor because the eye is not actually lit. 'Glassed' reminds us that the snake is dead. 'Garnet bits burned', garnet is a deep red stone, this is explained like this to give us another angle to see through her eyes and look at the snake's eyes. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Ochre' is a very dull colour and as said in the poem ' the way sun ruins a trout' the snake has now lost its shimmer and shine in its scales, apart from underneath its belly, which has 'kept its fire going under the chainmail', 'the old jewels smoldering there' again this gives another image of fire, and shows that the scales are very precious because they are now old and scarce. 'Opaque' - solid, the ':' is the substitute for the 'like' or 'as', in the following metaphor- 'each opaque belly-scale: sunset looked at through milk glass' this is depicted like this so that we can understand what the poet is trying to tell us, a milk glass is a smoky glass that would be used to look at the sun. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE DH Lawrence section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE DH Lawrence essays

  1. "Examine DH Lawrence's 'Mountain Lion' and 'Snake', showing how the poet a) uses language ...

    The damage has been done. Lawrence discovers her lair and there is a sense of emptiness. Something is missing - the lion. Once again, using a vivid description, he describes the situation of the lair. By using a number of clean-cut words and phrases, Lawrence conveys a real feel of the place.

  2. Explore Plath's thoughts about fear, power and death in two of her poems, 'Medallion' ...

    There are also hints of how the snake met its end `The yardman's flung brick perfected his laugh' the brick probably hit the snake on the head and killed it. `The Arrival of the Bee Box' also has lots of imagery `coffin of a midget' is what the bees arrived

  1. "In their poems "Snake" and "Medallion", D.H. Lawrence and Sylvia Plath describe the snakes ...

    This is because the repetition of the word "hot" and including the fact that the temperature was so high that people wore light clothing, "pyjamas" and showing that the heat was so unbearable that the snake was innocent to quench his thirst in the hot weather by going to the

  2. Compare the female characters in DH Lawrence’s ‘Tickets, Please’ and Thomas Hardy’s ‘Tony Kytes, ...

    In the opening paragraph of 'Tickets, Please', DH Lawrence prepares the reader for Annie's character by describing the tramcars that are driven by 'men unfit for active service: cripples and hunchbacks'. As a result of the war there was gender balance as men and women were 'companions in peril'.

  1. Compare and contrast the different attitude to animal shown by the poet in the ...

    This is personification as the animal cant get drunk as only humans get drunk so he is now making it out to be human so this is how it could be called a king. After he says that the animal has become drunk on the water the speed of the

  2. Compare the behaviour of the men and women in the two stories, one written ...

    It shows how the women were behaving in those days, as you can see from the traditional lifestyle, the women are ready to fight back and stronger. This is not how the girls would react in 'Tony Kytes'. When Milly comes, he has to give her a lift as well;

  1. D.H. Lawrence's 'Snake'.

    From Lawrence's ideological perspective, the snake is reminiscent of the serpent from the Garden of Eden. Despite the snake's intentions, despite the snake's "straight mouth" and "straight gums", it is rich with discrediting features, as seen from the perspective of the human subconscious (11-12).

  2. An Essay Comparing ‘Medallion’ and ‘Snake’

    Its innards are then described as jewels, which are protested by the snake's chain mail body. The belly is see-through, so the narrator can see the sunset through the snake's body; this is also the future of the deceased reptile.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work