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What methods does Lee use to build up danger in the Tim Johnson passage?

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Introduction

a) What methods does Lee use to build up a sense of danger in this passage? Lee creates a sense of danger through the dialogue in this passage. She shows Atticus gradually becoming more nervous through punctuation, for example "Don't just stand there, Heck!". By using an exclamation mark to suggest that Atticus is shouting, Lee shows to the reader that he is growing increasingly more anxious. This builds up a sense of danger, and creates tension for the reader, as we too become uneasy and fearful of what might happen next. This is also effective as it is one of the rare moments in the novel when Lee shows Atticus being nervous, which makes the passage more alarming. ...read more.

Middle

To Scout, and possibly the other onlookers, their fear has made them see Atticus move at a sluggish, lengthy pace, when in fact he is "walking quickly". Lee does this to elongate the tension for the reader, which gradually builds up the danger in the passage. In this passage, tension and danger are presented through Scouts innocent perspective of the event. We see, through Scout's eyes that there is real danger approaching because even the adults in the passage are fearful. For children, it is unusual and even alarming when adults are scared, so this exacerbates their own panic. Therefore this also builds up danger in the passage, through the other character's fear. ...read more.

Conclusion

Atticus' character does not change or progress throughout the novel, he is constantly the voice of reason. It could be argued that Lee does this to frame everyone else's difficulty in getting a better understanding of justice, but also to frame other characters progression throughout the novel. Atticus is used to embody justice, and used to distinguish the difference between right and wrong in the old racist town of Maycomb. "..Nigger-lover is just one of those terms... ignorant, trashy people use it". As Scout learns more about the existence of good and evil from Atticus, the readers understanding of morals and justice at the time also increases. This is a further way in which Lee uses Atticus to show injustice in the novel, because he is one of the few characters who acknowledge right and wrong. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This response shows a good understanding of the character and his role but it does not range around the text in enough detail. The points made are too brief and are not substantiated with enough references to the text. In order to show a full understanding of the full text ideas must be explored in more detail.

3 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 07/08/2013

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