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What thoughts, feelings and images might have been going through the awareness of Duncan, Banquo and Macbeth as they were dying?

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Introduction

"O treachery! Fly, good Fleance, fly, fly, fly! Thou mayst revenge...!" What thoughts, feelings and images might have been going through the awareness of Duncan, Banquo and Macbeth as they were dying? In Macbeth, King Duncan, Banquo and Macbeth are three major characters who come to their mortal perils. King Duncan and Banquo are killed by Macbeth, and are essentially good characters. On the other hand, Macbeth is an evil character (turns evil after committing treason) and is killed by Macduff for his wrongdoings. The murder of Duncan occurs first in the grand scheme of the play. Macbeth murders Duncan in in the hunt for his great aspiration for Duncan's crown and throne. The act of the murder is not shown on stage in the play and Macbeth also does not explain how he performs the deed. We can deduce though, that the strike of the dagger was swift and clean, and that Duncan most probably died in his sleep. ...read more.

Middle

" And yet I [Banquo] would not sleep; merciful powers, restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature gives way to repose"3; although this statement is pretty ambiguous, 'the cursed thoughts' could in fact mean his perception of Macbeth's ambitions of becoming king. Banquo also warns Macbeth that he will not join with him in any act that will not keep "his bosom franchised, and allegiance clear"4. Furthermore, at the beginning of Act 3.1, Banquo forwardly expresses his beliefs that Macbeth murdered Duncan. Even though Banquo is almost certain that Macbeth killed Duncan, he does absolutely nothing to counter this act. He does not speak a word to anyone about the prophesy and does not try to confront Macbeth by any means. Judging by this, Banquo must have felt extremely regretful for not doing anything about Macbeth treason. He also might have felt he should have pledged allegiance to Macbeth and accepted his murder of King Duncan instead of warning him beforehand, but judging by the goodness in Banquo's character, this i5s highly unlikely. ...read more.

Conclusion

His words are not only full of despair though; "Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing" is a statement which probably means Macbeth is trying to play down his crimes, that they are meaningless since '"life's but a walking shadow". Before and during his death, Macbeth is perhaps trying to lull himself into a sense that he is not an evildoer, just a "poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage". The thoughts, feelings and images that might have been going through the awareness of Duncan, Banquo and Macbeth were all quite different. Duncan seemed to have died in his sleep, Banquo was feeling regretful, thinking of revenge, and Macbeth was simply devastated and in a state of despair and hopelessness, which the only cure to was death. 1 Duncan; Act 1, Scene 4, Line 13. 2 Duncan; Act 1, Scene 4, Line 48. 3 Banquo; Act 2, Scene 3, Line 8-10 4 Banquo; Act 2, Scene 3, Line 28 6 Macbeth; Act 5, Scene 7, Line 58 ?? ?? ?? ?? November 06 Yusuf Mohamud 11B ...read more.

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