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When dining in China, one has to be very sure and particular about his/her table manners and etiquettes. For a Chinese, following the mannerisms means good conduct which further leads to establishing good relationships

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Introduction

Eating the Chinese way! When dining in China, one has to be very sure and particular about his/her table manners and etiquettes. For a Chinese, following the mannerisms means good conduct which further leads to establishing good relationships or guanxi, as the Chinese culture terms it. It is believed that the Chinese cuisine becomes more enjoyable if one has the knowledge of the ancient traditions and beliefs of the 5,000-year-old culinary heritage. Chinese table etiquettes might seem difficult to follow, but they are not impossible to learn. Thus, one not only needs to be well-read about the whole gamut of Chinese table etiquettes, but also put them to practice while dining out in China to avoid any odd situations. To begin with Chopsticks, one of the most important and traditional eating utensils of China. These are a pair of tapered sticks equal in length and many etiquette rules are governed by the proper conduct of the use of chopsticks. The important things to be kept in mind while using chopsticks are: 1. ...read more.

Middle

Communal chopsticks should not be used to pick up food from a shared plate. 14. When eating the noodle in noodle soup, it is advised to pick the noodle into a serving spoon first and then eat it from the spoon, rather than slurping it directly from the bowl. 15. When eating rice from a rice bowl, raising the rice bowl to the mouth before pushing the rice into the mouth using chopsticks is considered as a good etiquette. When eating from common dishes, keep in mind: 1. The food or the dish kept nearest to you has to be picked first rather than reaching out for the dish kept the farthest. 2. It is advisable not to put the food items to be eaten on the serving plate, when both a serving bowl and plate are provided. 3. When a soupy dish is served, placing the serving bowl near the serving dish is a good etiquette. This reduces the distance the chopsticks need carrying the food, thus avoiding any spilling of sauce on the table. ...read more.

Conclusion

One may say 'I'm unable to drink, but thank you' for refusing a drink. Differentiating between the seniority is also an important aspect of Chinese table etiquettes. One should keep in mind some of the tips which involve seniority of guests: 1. Make sure that the elderly or the guest of honour is the first to start a meal. 2. The eldest or most senior has to be served first by the youngest or least senior. 3. All the eldest members at the table are addressed by the youngest members before starting. 4. A seat facing the door is given to the eldest person or the guest of honour. 5. It is a good etiquette for the guest to praise the food given by the host, even if the host says that the food is not good. Hopefully, this piece of information is able to bring about the awareness of the common Chinese table etiquettes popular in the Chinese way of dining. So next time whenever you are at your favourite Chinese restaurant, do ask for a pair of chopsticks and try practicing some of the Chinese table etiquettes! ...read more.

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