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Whos to blame for the deaths for the Deaths of Romeo and Juliet

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Introduction

Who's to blame for the deaths for the Deaths of Romeo and Juliet In this essay I will address the question for, who's to blame for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. William Shakespeare (1564-1616.) Shakespeare is well acknowledged for his understanding of human nature and for writing exceptional poems. 1594 allegedly is the date assigned to the writing of Romeo and Juliet, however we know, it was first performed on 1595. The story of Romeo and Juliet was taken from the poem "The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet" written by Arthur Brooke 1562. However the original story possibly was copied by the Greek novelist Xenophon 4th Century AD. It was first published in 1597 during the first stage of Shakespeare's career. By this time he was 30 years old he got married to Anne Hathaway in 1582 and had 3 children. Shakespeare's themes in his plays are mostly love, hate and comical. In 1594 he wrote Richard II, Henry IV 1 & 2, and Henry V. He had an extraordinary theatrical career and was on its way to success. Within in same duration of time he had been acting in London for 5 years. Romeo and Juliet is a Tragedy. This includes a tragic flaw, weakness or excess or arrogant ambition (hubris) leads to downfall. The effect of this, the catastrophe, on the spectators is the emotions of pity and terror through what they have witnessed (Catharsis.) ...read more.

Middle

the offer, he responds into anger and he says "get thee to church a Thursday, or never look me in the face." Capulet is making a harsh decision to eject or disown Juliet if she refuses, which leaves her in a horrid position. As she is also married to Romeo. This is a pivotal point in the play and now she turns to the Friar and nurse for help. Who also unintentionally contributes some factors of the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. The Nurse is another adult in the tragedy that should take responsibility. The Nurse takes on a caring role in the play and is Juliet's advisor and messenger in the play as an adult she should have confided in Juliet's parents. However on the contrary lady Capulet doesn't exactly play the most Dearing mother in the world, instead a rather pushy parent that only has her best interests at heart. The Nurse helps the two get their marriage to happen. She even goes to Romeo and says, "For the gentlewoman is young and therefore, if you should deal double with her, truly it were an ill thing to be offered to any gentlewoman, and very weak dealing," meaning that she makes sure that Romeo knows to that he better mean that he wants to marry Juliet. The Nurse helps Juliet to get to her wedding, as was the only person other than Friar Laurence to be there. ...read more.

Conclusion

The English, or Shakespearean, sonnet consists of three quatrains (four-line stanzas) and a couplet (two lines), usually rhyming abab cdcd efef gg. The couplet usually comments on the ideas contained in the preceding twelve lines. Which creates an intimate atmosphere when they first meet, suggesting this is perfect love. Shakespeare also uses a soliloquy; is a long speech expressing the thoughts of a character alone or on stage. In Romeo and Juliet, Romeo gives a soliloquy after the servant has fled and Paris has died (Act 5 scene iii). A monologue is a speech by one character in a play, story, or poem. An example from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is the speech in which the Prince of Verona commands the Capulet's and Montague's to cease feuding (Act I, Scene i). An oxymoron is a phrase consisting of words that seem the opposite in meaning. Shakespeare cleverly illustrates this when Romeo is weeping over Rosaline like a love sick youth "Why then, O brawling love, O loving hate... O heavy lightness! Serious vanity." Juliet also uses oxymorons after having found out about her cousins death is at the hands of Romeo she says: "O serpent heart, hid with a flow'ring face! ... A damned saint, an honorable villain."(Act 3, Scene ii) however he has a momentary thought for her cousin but then goes on grieving about Romeo ?? ?? ?? ?? Alishba Danish ...read more.

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